defeat vs kill what difference

what is difference between defeat and kill

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɪˈfiːt/
  • Rhymes: -iːt

Etymology 1

From Middle English defeten, from Middle English defet (disfigured, past participle) and defet (defect, noun), see Etymology 2 below.

Verb

defeat (third-person singular simple present defeats, present participle defeating, simple past and past participle defeated)

  1. (transitive) To overcome in battle or contest.
    Wellington defeated Napoleon at Waterloo.
  2. (transitive) To reduce, to nothing, the strength of.
    • 1663, John Tillotson, The Wisdom of being Religious
      He finds himself naturally to dread a superior Being that can defeat all his designs, and disappoint all his hopes.
    • 1879, Adolphus Ward, Chaucer, in English Men of Letters
      In one instance he defeated his own purpose.
  3. (transitive) To nullify
    • 1827, Henry Hallam, The Constitutional History of England
      The escheators [] defeated the right heir of his succession.
Derived terms
  • self-defeating
Synonyms
  • vanquish, overcome, beat
Hyponyms
  • conquer (defeat and annex); rout, crush, cream (decisive); shutout, zilch (sports, to defeat without permitting any opposing score)
Related terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English defet, from French deffet, desfait, past participle of the verb desfaire (compare modern French défaire), from des- + faire.

Noun

defeat (countable and uncountable, plural defeats)

  1. The act or instance of being defeated, of being overcome or vanquished; a loss.
    Licking their wounds after a temporary defeat, they planned their next move.
  2. The act or instance of defeating, of overcoming, vanquishing.
    The inscription records her defeat of the country’s enemies in a costly war.
  3. Frustration (by prevention of success), stymieing; (law) nullification.
    • 1909, The Southern Reporter, page 250:
      … is subsequently issued to him, in accordance with his perfect equity thus acquired, by a legal fiction which the law creates for the protection, but not for the defeat, of his title.
    • 2008, Gene Porter, A Daughter of the Land, volume 1 (→ISBN), page 17:
      She could see no justice in being forced into a position that promised to end in further humiliation and defeat of her hopes.
  4. (obsolete) Destruction, ruin.
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing, act 4, scene 1:
      and made defeat of her virginity
Antonyms
  • victory
Translations

Anagrams

  • feated


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kʰɪl/
  • Rhymes: -ɪl

Etymology 1

From Middle English killen, kyllen, cüllen (to strike, beat, cut), of obscure origin.

  • Perhaps from Old English *cyllan, from Proto-West Germanic *kwulljan, from Proto-Germanic *kwuljaną, from Proto-Indo-European *gʷelH- (to throw, hit, hurt by throwing).
  • Or, possibly a variant of Old English cwellan (to kill, murder, execute) (see quell)
  • Or, from Old Norse kolla (to hit on the head, harm), related to Norwegian kylla (to poll), Middle Dutch kollen (to knock down), Icelandic kollur (top, head); see also coll, cole).

Compare also Middle Dutch killen, kellen (to kill), Middle Low German killen (to ache strongly, cause one great pain), Middle High German kellen (to torment; torture).

Verb

kill (third-person singular simple present kills, present participle killing, simple past and past participle killed)

  1. (transitive) To put to death; to extinguish the life of.
  2. (transitive) To render inoperative.
    • 1978, John Farris, The Fury
      Peter: Ask Childers if it was worth his arm.
      Policeman: What did you do to his arm, Peter?
      Peter: I killed it, with a machine gun.
  3. (transitive, figuratively) To stop, cease, or render void; to terminate.
  4. (transitive, figuratively, hyperbolic) To amaze, exceed, stun, or otherwise incapacitate.
  5. (transitive, figuratively, hyperbolic) To cause great pain, discomfort, or distress to.
  6. (transitive, figuratively) To produce feelings of dissatisfaction or revulsion in.
  7. (transitive) To use up or to waste.
  8. (transitive, figuratively, informal) To exert an overwhelming effect on.
  9. (transitive, figuratively, hyperbolic) To overpower, overwhelm, or defeat.
  10. (transitive) To force a company out of business.
  11. (intransitive, informal, hyperbolic) To produce intense pain.
  12. (figuratively, informal, hyperbolic, transitive) To punish severely.
  13. (transitive, sports) To strike (a ball, etc.) with such force and placement as to make a shot that is impossible to defend against, usually winning a point.
  14. (transitive, sports) To cause (a ball, etc.) to be out of play, resulting in a stoppage of gameplay.
  15. To succeed with an audience, especially in comedy.
  16. (mathematics, transitive, informal) To cause to assume the value zero.
  17. (computing, Internet, IRC, transitive) To disconnect (a user) involuntarily from the network.
  18. (metallurgy) To deadmelt.
Synonyms
  • (to put to death): assassinate, bump off, dispatch, ice, knock off, liquidate, murder, rub out, slaughter, slay, top, whack
  • (to use up or waste): fritter away, while away
  • (to render inoperative): break, deactivate, disable, turn off
  • (to exert an overwhelming effect on): annihilate (informal)
  • See also Thesaurus:kill
Hyponyms
  • instakill
  • instant kill
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Noun

kill (plural kills)

  1. The act of killing.
  2. Specifically, the death blow.
  3. The result of killing; that which has been killed.
    • If ye plunder his kill’ from a weaker, devour not all in thy pride.
  4. (volleyball) The grounding of the ball on the opponent’s court, winning the rally.
    • 2011, the 34th Catawba College Sports Hall of Fame, in Catawba College’s Campus Magazine, Spring/Summer 2011, page 21:
      As a senior in 1993, Turner had a kill percentage of 40.8, which was a school record at the time and the best in the SAC. Turner concluded her volleyball career with 1,349 kills, ranking fifth all-time at Catawba.
Derived terms
  • in for the kill
  • thrill kill
Translations

Etymology 2

Borrowing from Dutch kil, from Middle Dutch kille.

Noun

kill (plural kills)

  1. (north-east US) A creek; a body of water; a channel or arm of the sea.
Translations

Etymology 3

Noun

kill (plural kills)

  1. (rare) Alternative form of kiln

Cahuilla

Adverb

kíll

  1. Not

German

Pronunciation

Verb

kill

  1. singular imperative of killen
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of killen

Livonian

Etymology 1

Related to Finnish kylvää.

Alternative forms

  • (Courland) killõ

Verb

kill

  1. sow

Etymology 2

Related to Estonian kõlama.

Alternative forms

  • (Courland) ki’llõ

Verb

kill

  1. ring
  2. make noise

Luxembourgish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kil/
  • Rhymes: -il

Etymology 1

From Old High German kuoli, from Proto-West Germanic *kōl(ī), from Proto-Germanic *kōlaz. Cognate with German kühl, English cool, Dutch koel, Low German kool.

Adjective

kill (masculine killen, neuter killt, comparative méi kill, superlative am killsten)

  1. cool
Declension
Related terms
  • kal

Etymology 2

Verb

kill

  1. second-person singular imperative of killen

Ter Sami

Etymology

From Proto-Samic *kielë.

Noun

kill

  1. language

Derived terms

  • samekill

Further reading

  • Koponen, Eino; Ruppel, Klaas; Aapala, Kirsti, editors (2002-2008) Álgu database: Etymological database of the Saami languages[6], Helsinki: Research Institute for the Languages of Finland

Westrobothnian

Etymology

From Old Norse kið

Noun

kill f

  1. female kid (young goat)

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