defender vs protector what difference

what is difference between defender and protector

English

Alternative forms

  • defendor, defendour (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English defender, deffender, defendere, defendour, defendoure, partly from Anglo-Norman defendour, from Old French defendëor; partly from Middle English defenden + -ere, equivalent to defend +‎ -er.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /dɪˈfɛndə(ɹ)/
  • Rhymes: -ɛndə(ɹ)

Noun

defender (plural defenders)

  1. Someone who defends people or property.
  2. (sports) One of the players whose primary task is to prevent the opposition from scoring.
  3. A fighter who seeks to repel an attack.
    Synonyms: forefighter, protector
  4. (law, rare) A lawyer who represents defendants, especially a public defender; a defense attorney (US) or defence counsel (UK).
  5. (Scotland, law) A defendant in a civil action.

Translations

Anagrams

  • fendered, redefend

Interlingua

Verb

defender

  1. to defend

Conjugation


Ladino

Etymology

From Latin dēfendō, dēfendere.

Verb

defender (Latin spelling)

  1. to prohibit

Portuguese

Etymology

From Old Portuguese defender, from Latin dēfendere, present active infinitive of dēfendō.

Pronunciation

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /dɨ.fẽ.ˈdeɾ/
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /de.fẽ.ˈde(ʁ)/

Verb

defender (first-person singular present indicative defendo, past participle defendido)

  1. to defend (repel an attack)
    Synonyms: (archaic) defensar, proteger
  2. to defend (represent as a legal professional)
  3. (rhetoric) to defend
  4. to support (to back a cause, party etc.)
    Synonym: ser a favor de
  5. (sports) to defend (to prevent the opponent from scoring)
  6. (sports, intransitive) to play in defense
  7. (higher education) to formally present a dissertation, thesis or project
  8. first-person singular (eu) personal infinitive of defender
  9. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) personal infinitive of defender
  10. first-person singular (eu) future subjunctive of defender
  11. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) future subjunctive of defender

Conjugation

Quotations

For quotations using this term, see Citations:defender.

Related terms


Spanish

Etymology

From Latin dēfendere, present active infinitive of dēfendō. Cognate with English defend.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /defenˈdeɾ/, [d̪e.fẽn̪ˈd̪eɾ]

Verb

defender (first-person singular present defiendo, first-person singular preterite defendí, past participle defendido)

  1. to defend, to protect, to hold down (contra (against), de (from))
    Synonym: proteger
  2. to stand up for, to stick up for
  3. to uphold
  4. to prohibit
    Synonym: prohibir
  5. to claim
  6. (reflexive) to fight back
  7. (reflexive) to defend oneself, to protect oneself
  8. (reflexive) to stand up for oneself, to stick up for oneself
  9. (takes a reflexive pronoun) to fend off (+ de)
  10. (takes a reflexive pronoun) to get by

Conjugation

Derived terms

  • autodefenderse

Related terms

Further reading

  • “defender” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.


English

Alternative forms

  • protectour (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English protectour, from Anglo-Norman protectour, protector, from Latin prōtector, from prōtegō (shield, protect). Displaced native Old English ġesċildend.

Pronunciation

  • (US) enPR: prə-tĕk’tər, IPA(key): /pɹəˈtɛktɚ/
  • (UK) IPA(key): /pɹəˈtɛktə/
  • Rhymes: -ɛktə(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: pro‧tec‧tor

Noun

protector (plural protectors, feminine protectress or protectrix)

  1. Someone who protects or guards, by assignment or on their own initiative.
    • 2005 January 3, Jon Huntsman Jr., quoted in “Highlights from Gov. Jon Huntsman Jr.’s inauguration speech”, Deseret News, 4 January 2005:
      I stand before you in the spirit of pure public service — not as a protector of the status quo, but as an agent of change.
  2. A device or mechanism which is designed to protect.
  3. One who prevents interference. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  4. A state or other subject under international law, exercising a protectorate over another subject in international law.
  5. (Britain, historical) One having the care of the kingdom during the king’s minority; a regent.
  6. (Roman Catholicism) A cardinal, from one of the more considerable Roman Catholic nations, who looks after the interests of his people at Rome; also, a cardinal who has the same relation to a college, religious order, etc.

Synonyms

  • guard
  • sentry

Related terms

Translations


Catalan

Etymology

From Latin prōtēctor.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic) IPA(key): /pɾo.təkˈto/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /pɾu.təkˈto/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /pɾo.tekˈtoɾ/

Adjective

protector (feminine protectora, masculine plural protectors, feminine plural protectores)

  1. protective (serving to protect)

Noun

protector m (plural protectors, feminine protectora)

  1. protector (someone who protects or guards)

protector m (plural protectors)

  1. protector (a device or mechanism which is designed to protect)

Related terms

  • protecció
  • protegir

Further reading

  • “protector” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “protector” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “protector” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “protector” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Dutch

Etymology

From Latin prōtector, from prōtegō (to shield, protect).

Pronunciation

Noun

protector m (plural protectoren, diminutive protectortje n)

  1. A protector, guardian, regent etc.
  2. (rare) Title of certain orphanage governors

Synonyms

  • behoeder m
  • beschermer m
  • beschermheer m
  • protecteur m (close French cognate)

Derived terms

  • lord-protector m
  • protectorschap n

Related terms

  • protectie
  • protectoraat n

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /proːˈteːk.tor/, [pɾoːˈt̪eːkt̪ɔɾ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /proˈtek.tor/, [prɔˈt̪ɛkt̪ɔr]

Noun

prōtēctor m (genitive prōtēctōris); third declension

  1. protector (all senses)
  2. guardian; guard

Declension

Third-declension noun.

Descendants

References

  • protector in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • protector in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • protector in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Portuguese

Noun

protector m (plural protectores, feminine protectora, feminine plural protectoras)

  1. Superseded spelling of protetor. (superseded in Brazil by the 1943 spelling reform and by the Orthographic Agreement of 1990 elsewhere. Still used in countries where the agreement hasn’t come into effect and as an alternative spelling in Portugal.)

Adjective

protector m (feminine singular protectora, masculine plural protectores, feminine plural protectoras, comparable)

  1. Superseded spelling of protetor. (superseded in Brazil by the 1943 spelling reform and by the Orthographic Agreement of 1990 elsewhere. Still used in countries where the agreement hasn’t come into effect and as an alternative spelling in Portugal.)

Spanish

Etymology

From Latin prōtēctor.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɾotekˈtoɾ/, [pɾo.t̪ekˈt̪oɾ]

Adjective

protector (feminine protectora or protectriz, masculine plural protectores, feminine plural protectoras or protectrices)

  1. protective

Derived terms

  • ángel protector
  • cinta adhesiva protectora

Noun

protector m (plural protectores, feminine protectora or protectriz, feminine plural protectoras or protectrices)

  1. protector (someone who protects or guards)

Noun

protector m (plural protectores)

  1. protector (a device or mechanism which is designed to protect)

Related terms

Further reading

  • “protector” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial