deform vs strain what difference

what is difference between deform and strain

English

Etymology

From Middle English deformen, borrowed from Old French deformer, from Latin deformare, infinitive of deformo, from de- + formo (to form), from the noun forma (form).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /dɪˈfɔːm/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(r)m

Verb

deform (third-person singular simple present deforms, present participle deforming, simple past and past participle deformed)

  1. (transitive) To change the form of, usually negatively; to give (something) an unusual or abnormal shape.
    • 1693, Joseph Moxon, Mechanick Exercises, London: J. Moxon, 2nd ed., “Continued in the Art of Joynery,” § 22, p. 90,[1]
      […] you must take care to keep the Bitt straight to the Hole you pierce, lest you deform the Hole, or break the Bitt.
    • 1847, Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights, London: Thomas Cautley Newby, Volume 1, Chapter 13, p. 323,[2]
      […] deep indentations deformed the panels of the walls.
    • 1886, Robert Louis Stevenson, Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, London: Longmans, Green, “The Last Night,” pp. 75-76,[3]
      Your master, Poole, is plainly seized with one of those maladies that both torture and deform the sufferer; hence, for aught I know, the alteration of his voice; hence the mask and his avoidance of his friends […]
    • 2000, Michael Chabon, The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay, New York: Random House, Part 3, Chapter 2, p. 178,[4]
      […] Joe’s thick thatch of curls had been deformed by his headgear into a kind of glossy black hat […]
  2. (transitive) To change the looks of, usually negatively; to give something an unusual or abnormal appearance.
    Synonym: disfigure
    a face deformed by bitterness
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, London: William Ponsonbie, Book 3, Canto 6, p. 483,[5]
      Some of them washing with the liquid dew
      From of their dainty limbs the dusty sweat,
      And soyle which did deforme their liuely hew,
    • 1774, Henry Home, Lord Kames, Sketches of the History of Man, Dublin: James Williams, Volume 3, Sketch 12, p. 102,[6]
      […] their faces and bodies being deformed with paint, in order to terrify the enemy.
    • 1933, Gertrude Stein, The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas, New York: Harcourt, Brace, Chapter 3, p. 49,[7]
      Matisse at that time was at work at his first big decoration, Le Bonheur de Vivre. […] It was in this picture that Matisse first clearly realised his intention of deforming the drawing of the human body in order to harmonise and intensify the colour values of all the simple colours mixed only with white.
  3. (transitive) To mar the character of.
    a marriage deformed by jealousy
    • c. 1594, William Shakespeare, Love’s Labour’s Lost, Act V, Scene 2,[8]
      […] your beauty, ladies,
      Hath much deform’d us, fashioning our humours
      Even to the opposed end of our intents:
    • 1659, John Evelyn, A Character of England, London: Jo. Crooke, p. 28,[9]
      […] a Cento of unheard of Heresies […] which, at present, deform the once renowned Church of England;
    • 1742, Samuel Richardson, Pamela, London: S. Richardson, Volume 3, Letter 32, p. 240,[10]
      It made me tremble a little […] to think what a sad thing Passion is, when Way is given to its ungovernable Tumults, and how it deforms and debases the noblest Minds!
    • 1772, George Colman, Prologue, in Elizabeth Griffith, A Wife in the Right, London: for the author,[11]
      While narrow prejudice deform’d the age,
      No actress play’d, no female trod the Stage;
    • 1848, James Fenimore Cooper, The Oak Openings, New York: Burgess, Stringer, Volume 1, Chapter 10, p. 149,[12]
      […] the thousand and one sins that disgrace and deform society,
  4. (transitive) To alter the shape of by stress.
  5. (intransitive) To become misshapen or changed in shape.
    • 1974, Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, New York: Bantam, 1984, Part 2, Chapter 11, p. 117,[13]
      […] that metal’s hard and shiny and cold to the touch and deforms without breaking under blows from a harder material […]

Synonyms

  • distort, contort

Hyponyms

  • buckle
  • warp

Derived terms

  • deformable
  • deformer
  • retrodeform

Related terms

  • deformation
  • deformity

Translations

Adjective

deform (comparative more deform, superlative most deform)

  1. (obsolete) Having an unusual and unattractive shape.
    Synonyms: deformed, disfigured, misshapen
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, I.xii:
      who so kild that monster most deforme, / And him in hardy battaile ouercame, / Should haue mine onely daughter to his Dame []
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book 10, lines 491-492,[14]
      Sight so deform what heart of Rock could long
      Drie-ey’d behold?
    • 1785, William Cowper, The Task, London: J. Johnson, Book 1, p. 28,[15]
      The common overgrown with fern, and rough
      With prickly goss, that shapeless and deform
      And dang’rous to the touch, has yet its bloom
    • 1820, John Keats, The Eve of St. Agnes, stanza 42, in Lamia, Isabella, The Eve of St. Agnes, and Other Poems, London: Taylor and Hessey, p. 104,[16]
      Angela the old
      Died palsy-twitch’d, with meagre face deform;

Anagrams

  • formed


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stɹeɪ̯n/
  • Rhymes: -eɪn

Etymology 1

From Middle English streen, strene, streon, istreon (race, stock, generation), from Old English strēon, ġestrēon (gain, wealth), from Proto-Germanic *streuną (heap, treasure, profit, gain), from Proto-Indo-European *strew- (to spread, strew) (cognate with Old Saxon gistriuni, Old High German gistriuni (gain, property, wealth, business), Latin strues (heap)). Confused in Middle English with the related noun strend, strynd, strund, from Old English strȳnd (race; stock), from strēonan, strȳnan (to beget; acquire). Related also to Dutch struinen (to prowl, root about, rout).

Noun

strain (plural strains)

  1. (archaic) Race; lineage, pedigree.
  2. (biology) A particular variety of a microbe, virus, or other organism, usually a taxonomically infraspecific one.
  3. (figuratively) Hereditary character, quality, tendency, or disposition.
    Synonyms: propensity, proneness
    • a. 1694, John Tillotson, The Advantages of Religion to Societies
      Intemperance and lust breed diseases, which being propogated, spoil the strain of a nation.
  4. (music, poetry) Any sustained note or movement; a song; a distinct portion of an ode or other poem; also, the pervading note, or burden, of a song, poem, etc.
    Synonyms: theme, motive, manner, style
  5. Language that is eloquent, poetic, or otherwise heightened.
    (The addition of quotations indicative of this usage is being sought:)
  6. (rare) A kind or sort (of person etc.).
  7. (obsolete) Treasure.
  8. (obsolete) The blood-vessel in the yolk of an egg.
Translations
Related terms
  • strew

Etymology 2

From Middle English straynen, streinen, streynen, from Old French estreindre (whence French étreindre (to grip)), from Latin stringere (to draw tight together, to tie).

Verb

strain (third-person singular simple present strains, present participle straining, simple past and past participle strained)

  1. (obsolete) To hold tightly, to clasp.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.ii:
      So hauing said, her twixt her armes twaine / She straightly straynd, and colled tenderly []
    • Evander with a close embrace / Strained his departing friend.
    • 1859, Ferna Vale, Natalie; or, A Gem Among the Sea-Weeds
      “Farewell!”—the mother strained her child to her heart again, and again put her from her, to embrace her more closely.
  2. To apply a force or forces to by stretching out.
  3. To damage by drawing, stretching, or the exertion of force.
  4. To act upon, in any way, so as to cause change of form or volume, as when bending a beam.
  5. To exert or struggle (to do something), especially to stretch (one’s senses, faculties etc.) beyond what is normal or comfortable.
    • They strain their warbling throats / To welcome in the spring.
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, Moonfleet Chapter 4
      Thus my plight was evil indeed, for I had nothing now to burn to give me light, and knew that ’twas no use setting to grout till I could see to go about it. Moreover, the darkness was of that black kind that is never found beneath the open sky, no, not even on the darkest night, but lurks in close and covered places and strains the eyes in trying to see into it.
  6. To stretch beyond its proper limit; to do violence to, in terms of intent or meaning.
    • 1724, Jonathan Swift, Drapier’s Letters, 4
      There can be no other meaning in this expression, however some may pretend to strain it.
  7. (transitive) To separate solid from liquid by passing through a strainer or colander
  8. (intransitive) To percolate; to be filtered.
  9. To make uneasy or unnatural; to produce with apparent effort; to force; to constrain.
  10. To urge with importunity; to press.
  11. (transitive) hug somebody; to hold somebody tightly.
Derived terms
  • strainer
  • strain every nerve
Translations

Noun

strain (countable and uncountable, plural strains)

  1. The act of straining, or the state of being strained.
    • 1832, Charles Stewart Drewry (A.M.I.C.E.), A memoir on suspension bridges, page 183:
      If the Menai Bridge, for instance, were loaded at that rate, the entire strain on the main chains would be about 2000 tons ; while the chains containing 260 square inches of iron would bear, at 9 tons per square inch, 2340 tons, without stretching  …
    • 2004, Sanjay Shrivastava, Medical Device Materials: Proceedings from the Materials & Processes for Medical Devices Conference 2003, 8-10 September 2003, Anaheim, California, ASM International (→ISBN), page 176:
      Therefore, the goal of this study is to assess the influence of strain on the corrosion resistance of passivated Nitinol and stainless steel implant materials. Materials and Methods Nitinol (50.8%at. Ni) wire (NDC, Fremont, CA) and 316L stainless …
  2. A violent effort; an excessive and hurtful exertion or tension, as of the muscles.
  3. An injury resulting from violent effort; a sprain.
  4. (uncountable, engineering) A dimensionless measure of object deformation either referring to engineering strain or true strain.
  5. (obsolete) The track of a deer.
    • 1624, John Smith, Generall Historie, in Kupperman 1988, p. 145:
      When they have shot a Deere by land, they follow him like bloud-hounds by the bloud, and straine, and oftentimes so take them.
Derived terms
  • breaking strain

Translations

Related terms

  • stress
  • strict
  • stringent

Etymology 3

From Middle English strenen (to beget, father, procreate), from Old English strēonan, strīenan, strȳnan (to beget, generate, gain, acquire), from Proto-Germanic *striunijaną (to furnish, decorate, acquire).

Verb

strain (third-person singular simple present strains, present participle straining, simple past and past participle strained)

  1. (obsolete) To beget, generate (of light), engender, copulate (both of animals and humans), lie with, be born, come into the world.

Anagrams

  • Sartin, Tarins, Trains, atrins, instar, santir, sartin, starin’, tairns, tarins, trains

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial