deject vs dismay what difference

what is difference between deject and dismay

English

Etymology

From Old French dejeter, from Latin deicere (to throw down).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /dɪˈdʒɛkt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛkt

Verb

deject (third-person singular simple present dejects, present participle dejecting, simple past and past participle dejected)

  1. (transitive) Make sad or dispirited.
    • 1743, Robert Drury, The Pleasant, and Surprizing Adventures of Mr. Robert Drury, during his Fifteen Years Captivity on the Island of Madagascar, London, p. 73,[1]
      [] the Thoughts of my Friends, and native Country, and the Improbability of ever seeing them again, made me very melancholy; and dejected me to that Degree, that sometimes I could not forbear indulging my Grief in private, and bursting out into a Flood of Tears.
    • 1933 Arthur Melville Jordan: Educational Psychology (page 60) [2]
      On the other hand, there is nothing which dejects school children quite so much as failure.
  2. (obsolete, transitive) To cast downward.
    • 1642, Thomas Fuller, The Holy State, Cambridge: John Williams, Book 5, Chapter 1, p. 358,[3]
      [] sometimes she dejects her eyes in a seeming civility; and many mistake in her a cunning for a modest look.
  3. To debase or humble.

Translations

Noun

deject (plural dejects)

  1. One who is lowly or abject.
  2. (usually in the plural) A waste product.

Derived terms

  • dejected
  • dejection


English

Etymology

From Middle English dismayen, from Anglo-Norman *desmaiier, alteration of Old French esmaier (to frighten), probably from Vulgar Latin *exmagare (to deprive (someone) of strength, to disable), from ex- + *magare (to enable, empower), from Proto-Germanic *maginą, *maganą (might, power), from Proto-Indo-European *megʰ- (to be able). Akin to Old High German magan, megin (power, might, main), Old English mæġen (might, main), Old High German magan, mugan (to be powerful, able), Old English magan (to be able). Cognate with Portuguese desmaiar (to faint). See also Portuguese esmagar, Spanish amagar. More at main, may.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɪsˈmeɪ/
  • Rhymes: -eɪ

Verb

dismay (third-person singular simple present dismays, present participle dismaying, simple past and past participle dismayed)

  1. To cause to feel apprehension; great sadness, or fear; to deprive of energy
    Synonyms: daunt, appall, terrify
    • 1611, King James Version, Josh. i. 9
      Be not afraid, neither be thou dismayed.
    • What words be these? What fears do you dismay?
  2. To render lifeless; to subdue; to disquiet.
  3. To take dismay or fright; to be filled with dismay.
    • 1592, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 1, III. iii. 1:
      Dismay not, princes, at this accident,
Translations

Noun

dismay (uncountable)

  1. A sudden or complete loss of courage and firmness in the face of trouble or danger; overwhelming and disabling terror; a sinking of the spirits
    Synonym: consternation
    • 1596-97, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act I Scene 3
      Come on: in this there can be no dismay;
      My ships come home a month before the day.
  2. Condition fitted to dismay; ruin.

Translations

Anagrams

  • yidams

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