delimit vs subtend what difference

what is difference between delimit and subtend

English

Etymology

From French délimiter, from Late Latin dēlīmitō (I mark out the limits), from dē- + līmitō (I limit, I bound); see limit.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɪˈlɪmɪt/
  • Rhymes: -ɪmɪt

Verb

delimit (third-person singular simple present delimits, present participle delimiting, simple past and past participle delimited)

  1. (transitive) To mark or fix the limits of.
  2. (transitive) To demarcate.
    Data items in the computer file were delimited by commas.
    The square brackets delimit the list, and individual elements are separated by commas.WB

Related terms

  • limit
  • limitation
  • delimitation
  • delimiter

Translations

See also

  • unlimit (to remove limits)

Further reading

  • delimit in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • delimit in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • limited, melitid


English

Etymology

From Latin subtendere, from sub (under) + tendere (to stretch, extend). See tend.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sʌbˈtɛnd/
  • Rhymes: -ɛnd

Verb

subtend (third-person singular simple present subtends, present participle subtending, simple past and past participle subtended)

  1. (transitive, mathematics) To use an angle to delimit (mark off, enclose) part of a straight or curved line, for example an arc or the opposite side of a triangle.
    A 43° angle subtends an arc of about 0.75 meters on a circle with a radius of 1 meter.
  2. (transitive, also mathematics) To extend or stretch opposite something; to be part of a straight or curved line that is opposite to and delimits an angle.
    A hypotenuse subtends the right angle of a right triangle.
    An arc measuring about 0.75 meters on a circle with a radius of 1 meter subtends an angle of about 43°.
    • 2012, Me, myself, us,The Economist, 16th august 2012 issue
      …trillions of bacteria, each equally an individual, which are found in a person’s gut, his mouth, his scalp, his skin and all of the crevices and orifices that subtend from his body’s surface.
  3. (transitive, mathematics) To form the central angle of a circle underneath an arc
    The points A and B on the circumference form the arc AB, which subtends the central angle θ.

Translations

Anagrams

  • stub end

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