deliver vs rescue what difference

what is difference between deliver and rescue

English

Alternative forms

  • delivre (archaic)

Etymology

From Middle English deliveren, from Anglo-Norman and Old French delivrer, from Latin + līberō (to set free).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /dɪˈlɪvə(ɹ)/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /dɪˈlɪvɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪvə(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: de‧liv‧er

Verb

deliver (third-person singular simple present delivers, present participle delivering, simple past and past participle delivered)

  1. To set free from restraint or danger.
    Synonyms: free, liberate, release
  2. (process) To do with birth.
    1. To assist in the birth of.
    2. (formal, with “of”) To assist (a female) in bearing, that is, in bringing forth (a child).
      • Sche was delivered sauf and sone
    3. To give birth to.
  3. To free from or disburden of anything.
    • 1622, Henry Peacham, The Compleat Gentleman
      Tully was long ere he could be delivered of a few verses, and those poor ones.
  4. To bring or transport something to its destination.
  5. To hand over or surrender (someone or something) to another.
  6. (intransitive, informal) To produce what was expected or required.
    • 2004, Detroit News, Detroit Pistons: Champions at Work (page 86)
      “You know, he plays great sometimes when he doesn’t score,” Brown said. “Tonight, with Rip (Richard Hamilton) struggling, we needed somebody to step up, and he really did. He really delivered.”
  7. To express in words or vocalizations, declare, utter, or vocalize.
  8. To give forth in action or exercise; to discharge.
    • shaking his head and delivering some show of tears
  9. To discover; to show.
  10. (obsolete) To admit; to allow to pass.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)
  11. (medicine) To administer a drug.

Synonyms

  • (to set free): free, loose, rid, outbring
  • (to express): utter, outbring
  • (produce what was required): come through, come up with the goods

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • delivre, livered, relived, reviled


English

Etymology

From Middle English rescouen, from Old French rescoure, rescurre, rescorre; from Latin prefix re- (re-) + excutere, present active infinitive of excutiō (I shake or drive out), from ex (out) + quatiō (I shake).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɹɛs.kjuː/

Verb

rescue (third-person singular simple present rescues, present participle rescuing, simple past and past participle rescued) (transitive)

  1. To save from any violence, danger or evil.
    The well-trained team rescued everyone after the avalanche.
  2. To free or liberate from confinement or other physical restraint.
    to rescue a prisoner from the enemy.
  3. To recover forcibly.
  4. To deliver by arms, notably from a siege.
  5. (figuratively) To remove or withdraw from a state of exposure to evil and sin.
    Traditionally missionaries aim to rescue many ignorant heathen souls.
  6. (figuratively) To achieve something positive under difficult conditions.
    • 1999, Marion A. Kaplan, Between Dignity and Despair, Oxford University Press →ISBN
      Jews rescued some normalcy from increasingly difficult times by assuaging their constant Angst in the family and community and making do with less.
    • 2013, Daniel Harris, The Promised Land: Manchester United’s Historic Treble, Birlinn →ISBN
      Over the course of the season, on 15 occasions the team had rescued a draw or better after falling behind, such that even against Juventus, there was an air of inevitability about the comeback.

Synonyms

  • (to save from violence, danger or evil): free, deliver, pull out of the fire, save the day
  • (to free from confinement): liberate, release
  • (to free from restraint): release, unshackle, untie
  • (to recover forcibly): recapture, retake
  • (to deliver by arms): liberate
  • (to rescue from evil or sin): redeem, save

Antonyms

  • (all senses): abandon, ignore
  • (to save from violence, danger or evil): endanger, imperil
  • (to free from confinement): enslave, incarcerate
  • (to free from restraint): bind, constrict, hamper, inhibit, obstruct, preclude
  • (to recover forcibly): kidnap
  • (to deliver by arms): arrest, capture
  • (to rescue from evil or sin): corrupt, deprave

Derived terms

  • rescue circle
  • rescue dog
  • rescuee
  • rescue grass
  • rescue mission
  • rescuer

Related terms

  • quash

Translations

Noun

rescue (countable and uncountable, plural rescues)

  1. An act or episode of rescuing, saving.
  2. A liberation, freeing.
  3. The forcible ending of a siege; liberation from similar military peril
    The rescue of Jerusalem was the original motive of the Crusaders
  4. A special airliner flight to bring home passengers who are stranded
  5. A rescuee.
    The dog was a rescue with some behavior issues.

Usage notes

  • Often used attributively as an adjective, e.g. “rescue equipment”.

Derived terms

  • come to someone’s rescue
  • rescue dog
  • rescue mission

Translations

References

rescue in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • Creuse, cereus, ceruse, cursee, recuse, secuer, secure

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