deliver vs save what difference

what is difference between deliver and save

English

Alternative forms

  • delivre (archaic)

Etymology

From Middle English deliveren, from Anglo-Norman and Old French delivrer, from Latin + līberō (to set free).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /dɪˈlɪvə(ɹ)/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /dɪˈlɪvɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪvə(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: de‧liv‧er

Verb

deliver (third-person singular simple present delivers, present participle delivering, simple past and past participle delivered)

  1. To set free from restraint or danger.
    Synonyms: free, liberate, release
  2. (process) To do with birth.
    1. To assist in the birth of.
    2. (formal, with “of”) To assist (a female) in bearing, that is, in bringing forth (a child).
      • Sche was delivered sauf and sone
    3. To give birth to.
  3. To free from or disburden of anything.
    • 1622, Henry Peacham, The Compleat Gentleman
      Tully was long ere he could be delivered of a few verses, and those poor ones.
  4. To bring or transport something to its destination.
  5. To hand over or surrender (someone or something) to another.
  6. (intransitive, informal) To produce what was expected or required.
    • 2004, Detroit News, Detroit Pistons: Champions at Work (page 86)
      “You know, he plays great sometimes when he doesn’t score,” Brown said. “Tonight, with Rip (Richard Hamilton) struggling, we needed somebody to step up, and he really did. He really delivered.”
  7. To express in words or vocalizations, declare, utter, or vocalize.
  8. To give forth in action or exercise; to discharge.
    • shaking his head and delivering some show of tears
  9. To discover; to show.
  10. (obsolete) To admit; to allow to pass.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)
  11. (medicine) To administer a drug.

Synonyms

  • (to set free): free, loose, rid, outbring
  • (to express): utter, outbring
  • (produce what was required): come through, come up with the goods

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • delivre, livered, relived, reviled


English

Etymology

From Middle English saven, sauven, a borrowing from Old French sauver, from Late Latin salvāre (to save).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: sāv, IPA(key): /seɪv/
  • Rhymes: -eɪv

Verb

save (third-person singular simple present saves, present participle saving, simple past and past participle saved)

  1. (transitive) To prevent harm or difficulty.
    1. To help (somebody) to survive, or rescue (somebody or something) from harm.
    2. To keep (something) safe; to safeguard.
    3. To spare (somebody) from effort, or from something undesirable.
    4. (theology) To redeem or protect someone from eternal damnation.
    5. (sports) To catch or deflect (a shot at goal).
      • 2012, Chelsea 6-0 Wolves
        Chelsea’s youngsters, who looked lively throughout, then combined for the second goal in the seventh minute. Romeu’s shot was saved by Wolves goalkeeper Dorus De Vries but Piazon kept the ball alive and turned it back for an unmarked Bertrand to blast home.
  2. To put aside, to avoid.
    1. (transitive) To store for future use.
    2. (transitive) To conserve or prevent the wasting of.
      • An indulgent playmate, Grannie would lay aside the long scratchy-looking letter she was writing (heavily crossed ‘to save notepaper’) and enter into the delightful pastime of ‘a chicken from Mr Whiteley’s’.
    3. (transitive) To obviate or make unnecessary.
      • Will you not speak to save a lady’s blush?
    4. (transitive, intransitive, computing, video games) To write a file to disk or other storage medium.
    5. (intransitive) To economize or avoid waste.
    6. (transitive and intransitive) To accumulate money or valuables.

Usage notes

In computing sense “to write a file”, also used as phrasal verb save down informally. Compare other computing phrasal verbs such as print out and close out.

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

save (plural saves)

  1. In various sports, a block that prevents an opponent from scoring.
    The goaltender made a great save.
  2. (baseball) When a relief pitcher comes into a game leading by 3 points (runs) or less, and his team wins while continually being ahead.
    Jones retired seven to earn the save.
  3. (professional wrestling, slang) A point in a professional wrestling match when one or more wrestlers run to the ring to aid a fellow wrestler who is being beaten.
    The giant wrestler continued to beat down his smaller opponent, until several wrestlers ran in for the save.
  4. (computing) The act, process, or result of saving data to a storage medium.
    If you’re hit by a power cut, you’ll lose all of your changes since your last save.
    The game console can store up to eight saves on a single cartridge.
  5. (role-playing games) A saving throw.
  6. (informal) An action that brings one back out of an awkward situation.

Translations

Preposition

save

  1. Except; with the exception of.

Synonyms

  • barring, except for, save for; see also Thesaurus:except

Translations

Conjunction

save

  1. (dated) unless; except
    • 2009, Nicolas Brooke (translator), French Code of Civil Procedure in English 2008, Article 1 of Book One, quoted after: 2016, Laverne Jacobs and Sasha Baglay, The Nature of Inquisitorial Processes in Administrative Regimes: Global Perspectives, published by Routledge (first published in 2013 by Ashgate Publishing), p. 8:
      Only the parties may institute proceedings, save where the law shall provide otherwise.
    • Turning back, then, toward the basement staircase, she began to grope her way through blinding darkness, but had taken only a few uncertain steps when, of a sudden, she stopped short and for a little stood like a stricken thing, quite motionless save that she quaked to her very marrow in the grasp of a great and enervating fear.

Derived terms

  • save vs.
  • save as

Anagrams

  • AEVs, Esav, VASE, VESA, Veas, aves, vaes, vase

Bislama

Etymology

French savez (you know) and English savvy have been suggested as origins, but Charpentier considers Portuguese sabe (know), influenced by its Spanish cognate, more likely. Compare Tok Pisin save.

Verb

save

  1. to know
  2. to be able to
    mi no save kam : I can’t come
    mi save toktok Francis : I can speak French

References

  • Claire Moyse-Faurie, Borrowings from Romance languages in Oceanic languages, in Aspects of Language Contact (2008, →ISBN

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /saːvə/, [ˈsæːʋə], [ˈsæːʊ]
  • Rhymes: -aːvə

Etymology 1

From Old Norse saga, from Proto-Germanic *sagōną, cognate with Swedish såga, English saw, German sägen, Dutch zagen. Derived from the noun *sagō (Danish sav).

Verb

save (past tense savede, past participle savet)

  1. to saw
Inflection

References

  • “save” in Den Danske Ordbog

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun

save c

  1. indefinite plural of sav

Middle English

Adjective

save

  1. Alternative form of sauf

Preposition

save

  1. Alternative form of sauf

Conjunction

save

  1. Alternative form of sauf

Adverb

save

  1. Alternative form of sauf

Northern Sami

Pronunciation

  • (Kautokeino) IPA(key): /ˈsave/

Verb

save

  1. inflection of savvit:
    1. present indicative connegative
    2. second-person singular imperative
    3. imperative connegative

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from English save.

Noun

save m (plural saves)

  1. (informal, gaming) save file (of a video game or computer game)

Quotations

For quotations using this term, see Citations:save.


Tok Pisin

Etymology

From Portuguese sabe (know). Compare Bislama save.

Verb

save

  1. (transitive) to know
  2. (transitive) to understand
  3. (transitive) to make a practice or habit of
  4. (transitive) to learn

Derived terms

  • luksave

Adverb

save

  1. habitually

Noun

save

  1. knowledge


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