dell vs dingle what difference

what is difference between dell and dingle

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: dĕl, IPA(key): /dɛl/
  • Rhymes: -ɛl

Etymology 1

From Middle English delle, del, from Old English dell (small dale), from Proto-Germanic *daljō (a hollow, abyss), diminutive of Proto-Germanic *dalą (valley, dale), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰol-, *dʰel- (an arch, vaulting, curve, curvature, cavity). Cognate with Dutch del (a dell), German Delle (a hollow).

Noun

dell (plural dells)

  1. A valley, especially in the form of a natural hollow, small and deep.
    • 1794, William Blake, The Little Girl Found, lines 49-50
      To this day they dwell
      In a lonely dell.
    • 1722, Thomas Tickell, Kensington Gardens
      In dells and dales, conceal’d from human sight.
Synonyms
  • dale
  • dingle
  • vale
  • valley
  • See also Thesaurus:valley
Translations

Etymology 2

Origin obscure. Originally thieves’ cant. Compare Dutch del (trollop, floozie). This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Noun

dell (plural dells)

  1. (obsolete) A young woman; a wench.
    • 1621, Ben Jonson, The Gypsies Metamorphosed
      Sweet doxies and dells
Derived terms
  • wapping dell

References


Albanian

Etymology

From Proto-Albanian *daislā, from Proto-Indo-European *gʷʰiH-slo (compare Latin fīlum, Lithuanian gýsla, Serbo-Croatian žȉla).

Noun

dell m (indefinite plural dej, definite singular delli, definite plural dejt)

  1. (anatomy) tendon
  2. sinew

Declension

References


Maltese

Etymology

From Arabic ظِلّ(ẓill).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɛll/

Noun

dell m (plural dellijiet)

  1. shade, shadow

Manx

Verb

dell (verbal noun dellal)

  1. to negotiate, deal, trade, traffic

Mutation


Middle English

Noun

dell

  1. Alternative form of delle

Westrobothnian

Preposition

dell

  1. Alternative form of dill


English

Etymology

From Middle English dingle (a deep hollow; dell), from Old English *dyngel, a diminutive of Old English ding, dung (dungeon; pit), equivalent to dung +‎ -le. Compare also dimble (a dingle, glen, retired place).

Related to dungeon.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdɪŋɡl̩/
  • Rhymes: -ɪŋɡəl

Noun

dingle (plural dingles)

  1. A small, narrow or enclosed, usually wooded valley.
    • 1954, J. R. R. Tolkien, The Two Towers, Book III, Chapter 4
      Turning to the left and skirting this huge hedge Treebeard came in a few strides to a narrow entrance. Through it a worn path passed and dived suddenly down a long steep slope. The hobbits saw that they were descending into a great dingle, almost as round as a bowl, very wide and deep, crowned at the rim with the high dark evergreen hedge.

Translations

Anagrams

  • elding, engild, gilden, ingled

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

Related to dangle and denge

Verb

dingle (imperative dingl or dingle, present tense dingler, passive dingles, simple past and past participle dingla or dinglet, present participle dinglende)

  1. to dangle, hang, swing

References

  • “dingle” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Alternative forms

  • dingla

Etymology

Delated to dangle and denge

Verb

dingle (present tense dinglar, past tense dingla, past participle dingla, passive infinitive dinglast, present participle dinglande, imperative dingl)

  1. to dangle, hang, swing

References

  • “dingle” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

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