deluge vs waterspout what difference

what is difference between deluge and waterspout

English

Etymology

From Middle English deluge, from Old French deluge, alteration of earlier deluvie, from Latin dīluvium, from dīluō (wash away). Doublet of diluvium.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈdɛl.juːdʒ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈdɛl.ju(d)ʒ/, /dəˈlu(d)ʒ/

Noun

deluge (plural deluges)

  1. A great flood or rain.
    The deluge continued for hours, drenching the land and slowing traffic to a halt.
  2. An overwhelming amount of something; anything that overwhelms or causes great destruction.
    The rock concert was a deluge of sound.
    • 1848, James Russell Lowell, The Vision of Sir Launfal
      The little bird sits at his door in the sun, / Atilt like a blossom among the leaves, / And lets his illumined being o’errun / With the deluge of summer it receives.
  3. (military engineering) A damage control system on navy warships which is activated by excessive temperature within the Vertical Launching System.
    • 2002, NAVEDTRA, Gunner’s Mate 14324A
      In the event of a restrained firing or canister overtemperature condition, the deluge system sprays cooling water within the canister until the overtemperature condition no longer exists.

Translations

Verb

deluge (third-person singular simple present deluges, present participle deluging, simple past and past participle deluged)

  1. (transitive) To flood with water.
  2. (transitive) To overwhelm.

Translations

References

  • 1996, T.F. Hoad, The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Etymology, Oxford University Press, →ISBN

See also

  • inundate

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • diluge

Etymology

From Old French deluge, from Latin dīluvium.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdɛːliu̯dʒ(ə)/

Noun

deluge (Late Middle English)

  1. A deluge; a massive flooding or raining.
  2. (rare, figuratively) Any cataclysmic or catastrophic event.

Descendants

  • English: deluge

References

  • “dēlūǧe, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-08-12.

Old French

Etymology

From Latin dīluvium.

Noun

deluge m (oblique plural deluges, nominative singular deluges, nominative plural deluge)

  1. large flood

Descendants

  • French: déluge
  • Middle English: deluge
    • English: deluge


English

Etymology

water +‎ spout

Noun

waterspout (plural waterspouts)

  1. A whirlwind that forms over water, not associated with a mesocyclone of a thunderstorm (contrary to a true tornado).
  2. A true tornado that passes over a body of water.
  3. A channel through which water is discharged, especially from the gutters of a roof.

Quotations

water tornado
  • 1922, Katherine Mansfield, At The Bay [1]
    Stanley turned over on his back and kicked with his legs till he was a living waterspout.

Hypernyms

(windstorm):

  • whirlwind

Related terms

  • landspout

Coordinate terms

(windstorm):

  • dust devil

See also

(windstorm):

  • fire whirl

(water discharge channel):

  • gargoyle

Translations


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