deny vs traverse what difference

what is difference between deny and traverse

English

Etymology

From Middle English denyen, from Old French denoier (to deny, to repudiate) (French dénier), from Latin denegare (to deny, to refuse), from de- (away) and negare (to refuse), the latter ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ne (no, not). Doublet of denegate.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /dɪˈnaɪ/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /dəˈnaɪ/, /dɪ-/
  • Rhymes: -aɪ
  • Hyphenation: de‧ny

Verb

deny (third-person singular simple present denies, present participle denying, simple past and past participle denied)

  1. (transitive) To disallow or reject.
  2. (transitive) To assert that something is not true.
  3. (ditransitive) To refuse to give or grant something to someone.
    • 1754, Jonathan Edwards, An Inquiry into the Modern Prevailing Notions Respecting that Freedom of the Will which is supposed to be Essential to Moral Agency
      To some men, it is more agreeable to deny a vicious inclination, than to gratify it.
  4. To take something away from someone; to deprive of.
  5. (sports, transitive) To prevent from scoring.
  6. To disclaim connection with, responsibility for, etc.; to refuse to acknowledge; to disown; to abjure; to disavow.
    • 1834-1874, George Bancroft, History of the United States, from the Discovery of the American Continent.
      the falsehood of denying his opinion
    • 1827, John Keble, The Christian Year
      thou thrice denied, yet thrice beloved
  7. (obsolete) To refuse (to do or accept something).

Usage notes

  • This is a catenative verb that takes the gerund (-ing). See Appendix:English catenative verbs.
  • Deny can have a connotation that the denial is false; he denied knowing the accused has a more suspicious tone than he said he did not know the accused. However, in some formal usages, e.g. medical records, it can have a more neutral sense (patient denies chest pain).
  • See refute.
Conjugation

Synonyms

  • (assert something is not true): gainsay, contradict, withsay, refute, disclaim

Antonyms

  • (disallow): allow
  • (assert something is true): confirm, affirm

Derived terms

  • deniability
  • denier
  • justice delayed is justice denied

Related terms

  • denial

Translations

Anagrams

  • E.D.N.Y., EDNY, Ynde, dyne

Middle English

Verb

deny

  1. Alternative form of denyen


English

Etymology

From Middle English traversen, from Old French traverser, from Latin trans (across) + versus (turned), perfect passive participle of Latin vertere (to turn).

Pronunciation

All parts of speech:

  • (General American) IPA(key): /tɹəˈvɝs/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /tɹəˈvɜːs/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)s
  • Hyphenation: tra‧verse

Alternative noun pronunciation:

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈtɹævɚs/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈtɹævəs/
  • Hyphenation: trav‧erse

Noun

traverse (plural traverses)

  1. (climbing) A route used in mountaineering, specifically rock climbing, in which the descent occurs by a different route than the ascent.
  2. (surveying) A series of points, with angles and distances measured between, traveled around a subject, usually for use as “control” i.e. angular reference system for later surveying work.
  3. (obsolete) A screen or partition.
    • 1499, John Skelton, The Bowge of Court:
      Than sholde ye see there pressynge in a pace / Of one and other that wolde this lady see, / Whiche sat behynde a traves of sylke fyne, / Of golde of tessew the fynest that myghte be []
    • 1613, Francis Beaumont, The Masque of the Inner Temple and Gray’s Inn
      At the entrance of the king, / The first traverse was drawn.
  4. Something that thwarts or obstructs.
    He will succeed, as long as there are no unlucky traverses not under his control.
  5. (architecture) A gallery or loft of communication from side to side of a church or other large building.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Gwilt to this entry?)
  6. (law) A formal denial of some matter of fact alleged by the opposite party in any stage of the pleadings. The technical words introducing a traverse are absque hoc (“without this”, i.e. without what follows).
  7. (nautical) The zigzag course or courses made by a ship in passing from one place to another; a compound course.
  8. (geometry) A line lying across a figure or other lines; a transversal.
  9. (military) In trench warfare, a defensive trench built to prevent enfilade.
    • 1994, Stephen R. Wise, Gate of Hell: Campaign for Charleston Harbor, 1863 (page 160)
      At night, when the Federal guns slowed their fire, the men created new traverses and bombproofs.
  10. (obsolete) A traverse board.
    • 1789, Olaudah Equiano, The Interesting Narrative, vol. I, ch. 7:
      The whole care of the vessel rested, therefore, upon me, and I was obliged to direct her by my former experience, not being able to work a traverse.

Related terms

  • Grand Traverse County
  • traversal
  • Traverse City
  • Traverse County
  • traversive
  • travis

Translations

Verb

traverse (third-person singular simple present traverses, present participle traversing, simple past and past participle traversed)

  1. (transitive) To travel across, often under difficult conditions.
    He will have to traverse the mountain to get to the other side.
  2. (transitive, computing) To visit all parts of; to explore thoroughly.
    to traverse all nodes in a network
  3. To lay in a cross direction; to cross.
    • The parts should be often traversed, or crossed, by the flowing of the folds.
  4. (artillery) To rotate a gun around a vertical axis to bear upon a military target.
    to traverse a cannon
  5. (climbing) To climb or descend a steep hill at a wide angle (relative to the slope).
  6. (engineering, skiing) To (make a cutting, an incline) across the gradients of a sloped face at safe rate.
    the road traversed the face of the ridge as the right-of-way climbed the mountain
    The last run, weary, I traversed the descents in no hurry to reach the lodge.
  7. To act against; to thwart or obstruct.
    • 1764, Horace Walpole, The Castle of Otranto, II:
      The well-meaning priest suffered him to deceive himself, fully determined to traverse his views, instead of seconding them.
  8. To pass over and view; to survey carefully.
    • 1675, Robert South, Of the odious Sin of Ingratitude (A Sermon preached at Christ-Church, Oxon, October 17, 1675)
      My purpose is to [] traverse the nature, principles, and properties of this detestable vice — ingratitude.
  9. (carpentry) To plane in a direction across the grain of the wood.
    to traverse a board
  10. (law) To deny formally.
    • 1699, John Dryden, Epistle to John Dryden
      And save the expense of long litigious laws, / Where suits are traversed, and so little won / That he who conquers is but last undone.
  11. (intransitive, fencing) To use the motions of opposition or counteraction.

Translations

Adverb

traverse (comparative more traverse, superlative most traverse)

  1. athwart; across; crosswise

Adjective

traverse (comparative more traverse, superlative most traverse)

  1. Lying across; being in a direction across something else.
    paths cut with traverse trenches
    • the ridges of the fallow field lay trauerse

Derived terms

  • traverse drill

Anagrams

  • averrest, averters

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tʁa.vɛʁs/
  • IPA(key): /tʁa.vɛʁs/

Etymology 1

From Vulgar Latin traversa, feminine of traversus.

Noun

traverse f (plural traverses)

  1. crossing
  2. (literary) obstacle, hurdle
  3. (rail transport) sleeper (UK), tie (US)

Etymology 2

Inflected forms.

Verb

traverse

  1. inflection of traverser:
    1. first-person and third-person singular present indicative
    2. first-person and third-person singular present subjunctive
    3. second-person singular imperative

Anagrams

  • réservât, reversât

Further reading

  • “traverse” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Adjective

traverse

  1. feminine plural of traverso

Noun

traverse f

  1. plural of traversa

Anagrams

  • varreste

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