depart vs start what difference

what is difference between depart and start

English

Etymology

From Old French departir, from Late Latin departiō (to divide).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: dĭ-pät’, IPA(key): /dɪˈpɑːt/
  • (General American) enPR: dĭ-pärt’, IPA(key): /dɪˈpɑɹt/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)t

Verb

depart (third-person singular simple present departs, present participle departing, simple past and past participle departed)

  1. (intransitive) To leave.
    • c. 1598, William Shakespeare, Henry V, Act IV, Scene 3,[1]
      […] he which hath no stomach to this fight,
      Let him depart;
    • 1611, King James Version of the Bible, 1 Samuel 4.21,[2]
      The glory is departed from Israel.
    • 1839, Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby, Chapter 56,[3]
      With very little excuse for departing so abruptly, Ralph left him […]
    • 2009, George Monbiot, The Guardian, 7 September:
      The government maintains that if its regulations are too stiff, British bankers will leave the country. It’s true that they have been threatening to depart in droves, but the obvious answer is: “Sod off then.”
  2. (intransitive) To set out on a journey.
    • 1886, Thomas Hardy, The Mayor of Casterbridge, Chapter 28,[4]
      Elizabeth saw her friend depart for Port-Bredy […]
    • 1904, Joseph Conrad, Nostromo, Part 2, Chapter 4,[5]
      Distant acclamations, words of command yelled out, and a roll of drums on the jetty greeted the departing general.
  3. (intransitive) To die.
    • c. 1597, William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part 2, Act I, Scene 1,[6]
      […] his tongue
      Sounds ever after as a sullen bell,
      Rememb’red tolling a departing friend.
    • 1611, King James Version of the Bible, Luke 2.29,[7]
      Lord, now lettest thou thy servant depart in peace.
  4. (intransitive, figuratively) To disappear, vanish; to cease to exist.
    • 1846, Charlotte Brontë, “The Teacher’s Monologue” in Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell,[8]
      For youth departs, and pleasure flies,
      And life consumes away,
    • 1934, George Orwell, Burmese Days, Chapter 15,[9]
      An extraordinary joie de vivre had come over them all as soon as the shaky feeling departed from their legs.
  5. (intransitive) To deviate (from), be different (from), fail to conform.
    His latest statements seemed to depart from party policy somewhat.
    to depart from a title or defence in legal pleading
    • 1788, James Madison, “Number 39,” in Alexander Hamilton, John Jay and James Madison, The Federalist, On the New Constitution, Philadelphia: Benjamin Warner, 1818, p. 204,[10]
      If the plan of the convention, therefore, be found to depart from the republican character, its advocates must abandon it as no longer defensible.
    • 1960, Muriel Spark, The Bachelors, Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1961, Chapter 12, p. 201,[11]
      […] he compared the precise points at which the handwriting of the letter departed from examples of Freda Flower’s handwriting and coincided with examples of Patrick Seton’s […]
  6. (transitive) To go away from; to leave.
    • 1589, John Eliot (translator), Aduise giuen by a Catholike gentleman, to the nobilitie & commons of France, London: John Wolfe, p. 27,[12]
      […] he […] did pray them only to do no thing against the honor of God, & rather to depart the territories of his empire, then to suffer their consciences to be forced.
    • 1989, Kazuo Ishiguro, The Remains of the Day, Vintage Canada, 2014, “Day Two: Morning,”[13]
      At one stage, when I happened to depart the room in the midst of an address by one of the German gentlemen, M. Dupont suddenly rose and followed me out.
    • 1997, Richard Flanagan, The Sound of One Hand Clapping, New York: Grove, 2001, Chapter 64, p. 323,[14]
      She felt what Mrs Maja Picotti had suspected in her prayers, that her soul had departed her body.
    • 2009, The Guardian, Sport Blog, 9 September:
      The build-up to Saturday’s visit of Macedonia and this encounter with the Dutch could be construed as odd in the sense that there seemed a basic acceptance, inevitability even, that Burley would depart office in their immediate aftermath.
  7. (obsolete, transitive) To divide up; to distribute, share.
    • and so all the worlde seythe that betwyxte three knyghtes is departed clerely knyghthode, that is Sir Launcelot du Lake, Sir Trystrams de Lyones and Sir Lamerok de Galys—thes bere now the renowne.
    • 1595, Arthur Golding (translator), Politicke, Moral, and Martial Discourses by Jacques Hurault, London: Adam Islip, Book 3, Chapter 17, p. 458,[15]
      Then fortified hee his trenches, and departed them in foure quarters, wherein he made good store of fires, in such distance one from another, as are woont to be made in a campe.
    • 1597, Thomas Dawson, The Second part of the good Hus-wiues Iewell, London: Edward White,[16]
      Fyrst on that day yee shall serue a calfe sodden and blessed, and sodden egs with greene sauce, and set them before the most principall estate, and that Lorde because of his high estate, shal depart them al about him […]
    • 1602, Patrick Simon (translator), The Estate of the Church with the Discourse of Times, from the Apostles untill This Present, London: Thomas Creede, “Extract out of the Acts of the Councell of Nice,” p. 102,[17]
      That Deacons be not preferred before Priests, nor sit in their ranke, nor in their presence do distribute the Sacraments but only minister vnto them, and assist when they do distribute: but when there are no Priests there, in that case they may depart them.
  8. (obsolete, transitive) To separate, part.
    • Syr knyght[,] said the two squyers that were with her[,] yonder are two knyghtes that fyghte for thys lady, goo thyder and departe them [].
    • 1550, Thomas Nicholls (translator), The Hystory Writtone by Thucidides the Athenyan, London, Book 3, Chapter 2, p. 74,[18]
      Thies be than the causes […] for the whiche we depart our selues from the Athenyans […]
    • 1582, Stephen Batman (translator), Batman vppon Bartholome his booke De proprietatibus rerum, London: Thomas East, Book 5, Chapter 26, “Of the shoulders,”[19]
      The twisted forkes [i.e. fork-shaped bones] be néedfull to binde the shoulders, and to depart them from the breast.
    • 1617, Thomas Taylor, Dauids Learning, London: Henry Fetherstone, Dedicatory epistle,[20]
      Great is the affinitie of soule and body, neerely coupled and wedded by God, like Husband & Wife, for better and worse till death depart them.

Usage notes

The past participle, departed, unlike that of the majority of English verbs, has an active, rather than a passive sense when used adjectivally:

  • not even a legible inscription to record its departed greatness (Charles Dickens, American Notes, Chapter 8,[21])
  • As soon as they had left, Mrs. Gibson began her usual comments on the departed visitors. (Elizabeth Gaskell, Wives and Daughters, Chapter 16,[22])
  • the sky still clung to and retained some lingering skirts of light from the departed day (Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows, Chapter 7,[23])

Synonyms

  • (to leave): See Thesaurus:leave
  • (to die): See Thesaurus:die
  • (to deviate): deviate, digress, diverge, sidetrack, straggle, vary
  • (to go away from): leave

Antonyms

  • (to leave): arrive, come, stay
  • (to die): live
  • (to deviate): conform

Related terms

  • departure
  • dearly departed

Translations

Noun

depart

  1. (obsolete) Division; separation, as of compound substances.
  2. (obsolete) A going away; departure.
    • c. 1590, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 2, Act I, Scene 1,[24]
      at my depart for France
    • 1633, John Donne, “To M. I. L.” in Poems, London: John Marriot, p. 101,[25]
      Of that short Roll of friends writ in my heart
      Which with thy name begins, since their depart,
      Whether in the English Provinces they be,
      Or drinke of Po, Sequan, or Danubie,

Anagrams

  • detrap, drapet, parted, petard, prated, rapted, tarped, traped


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /stɑːt/
  • (General American) enPR: stärt, IPA(key): /stɑɹt/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)t

Etymology 1

From Middle English stert, from the verb sterten (to start, startle). See below.

Noun

start (plural starts)

  1. The beginning of an activity.
    The movie was entertaining from start to finish.
  2. A sudden involuntary movement.
    He woke with a start.
    • 1885, Robert Louis Stevenson, Olalla
      The sight of his scared face, his starts and pallors and sudden harkenings, unstrung me []
  3. The beginning point of a race, a board game, etc.
    Captured pieces are returned to the start of the board.
  4. An appearance in a sports game, horserace, etc., from the beginning of the event.
    Jones has been a substitute before, but made his first start for the team last Sunday.
  5. (horticulture) A young plant germinated in a pot to be transplanted later.
    • 2009, Liz Primeau, Steven A. Frowine, Gardening Basics For Canadians For Dummies
      You generally see nursery starts at garden centres in mid to late spring. Small annual plants are generally sold in four-packs or larger packs, with each cell holding a single young plant.
  6. An initial advantage over somebody else; a head start.
    to get, or have, the start
Derived terms
Descendants
  • German: Start
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English sterten (to leap up suddenly, rush out), from Old English styrtan (to leap up, start), from Proto-West Germanic *sturtijan (to startle, move, set in motion), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)ter- (to be stiff). Cognate with Old Frisian stirta (to fall down, tumble), Middle Dutch sterten (to rush, fall, collapse) (Dutch storten), Old High German sturzen (to hurl, plunge, turn upside down) (German stürzen), Old High German sterzan (to be stiff, protrude). More at stare.

Verb

start (third-person singular simple present starts, present participle starting, simple past and past participle started)

  1. (transitive) To begin, commence, initiate.
    1. To set in motion.
      • April 2, 1716, Joseph Addison, Freeholder No. 30
        I was some years ago engaged in conversation with a fashionable French Abbe, upon a subject which the people of that kingdom love to start in discourse.
    2. To begin.
    3. To initiate operation of a vehicle or machine.
    4. To put or raise (a question, an objection); to put forward (a subject for discussion).
    5. To bring onto being or into view; to originate; to invent.
      • 1674, William Temple, letter to The Countess of Essex
        Sensual men agree in the pursuit of every pleasure they can start.
  2. (intransitive) To begin an activity.
  3. (intransitive) To have its origin (at), begin.
  4. To startle or be startled; to move or be moved suddenly.
    1. (intransitive) To jerk suddenly in surprise.
      • I start as from some dreadful dream.
      • 1725, Isaac Watts, Logick, or The Right Use of Reason in the Enquiry After Truth With a Variety of Rules to Guard
        Keep your soul to the work when it is ready to start aside.
      • 1855, Robert Browning, “Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came”, XXXI:
        […] The tempest’s mocking elf / Points to the shipman thus the unseen shelf / He strikes on, only when the timbers start.
    2. (intransitive) To awaken suddenly.
    3. (transitive) To disturb and cause to move suddenly; to startle; to alarm; to rouse; to cause to flee or fly.
      • c. 1603, William Shakespeare, Othello, Act I, Scene i[2]:
        […]Upon malicious bravery dost thou come / To start my quiet?
    4. (transitive) To move suddenly from its place or position; to displace or loosen; to dislocate.
      • 1676, Richard Wiseman, Severall Chirurgical Treatises
        One, by a fall in wrestling, started the end of the clavicle from the sternon.
  5. (intransitive) To break away, to come loose.
  6. (transitive, sports) To put into play.
    • 2010, Brian Glanville, The Story of the World Cup: The Essential Companion to South Africa 2010, London: Faber and Faber, →ISBN, page 361:
      The charge against Zagallo then is not so much that he started Ronaldo, but that when it should surely have been clear that the player was in no fit state to take part he kept him on.
  7. (transitive, nautical) To pour out; to empty; to tap and begin drawing from.
  8. (intransitive, euphemistic) To start one’s periods (menstruation).
Usage notes
  • In uses 1.1 and 1.2 this is a catenative verb that takes the infinitive (to) or the gerund (-ing) form. There is no change in meaning.
  • For more information, see Appendix:English catenative verbs
Antonyms
  • stop
  • end
Derived terms
  • astart
  • start-up
  • starter
Descendants
  • Dutch: starten
  • German: starten
  • Norman: stèrter
  • French: starter
  • Icelandic: starta
  • Faroese: starta
  • Norwegian Bokmål: starte
  • Norwegian Nynorsk: starta
  • Swedish: starta
  • Danish: starte
  • Slovak: štartovať
Translations

See also

Etymology 3

From Middle English stert, start, from Old English steort, stert, from Proto-Germanic *stertaz (tail). Cognate with Dutch staart (tail), German Sterz (tail, handle), Swedish stjärt (tail, arse).

Noun

start (plural starts)

  1. A tail, or anything projecting like a tail.
  2. A handle, especially that of a plough.
  3. The curved or inclined front and bottom of a water wheel bucket.
  4. The arm, or level, of a gin, drawn around by a horse.

Derived terms

  1. redstart

Anagrams

  • Strat, Tarts, strat, tarts

Breton

Adjective

start

  1. firm, strong
  2. difficult

Derived terms

  • startijenn

Further reading

  • Herve Ar Bihan, Colloquial Breton, pages 16 and 268: define “start” as “hard, difficult, firm”

Crimean Tatar

Etymology

Borrowed from English start.

Noun

start

  1. start

Declension

References

  • Mirjejev, V. A.; Usejinov, S. M. (2002) Ukrajinsʹko-krymsʹkotatarsʹkyj slovnyk [Ukrainian – Crimean Tatar Dictionary]‎[3], Simferopol: Dolya, →ISBN

Czech

Etymology

Borrowed from English start.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈstart]

Noun

start m

  1. start (beginning point of a race)

Declension

Related terms

  • připravit se, pozor, start

See also

  • cíl m

Further reading

  • start in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • start in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish

Etymology

Borrowed from English start.

Noun

start c (singular definite starten, plural indefinite starter)

  1. start

Inflection

Verb

start

  1. imperative of starte

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stɑrt/
  • Hyphenation: start
  • Rhymes: -ɑrt

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English start.

Noun

start m (plural starts, diminutive startje n)

  1. start
Derived terms
  • pikstart
  • startbaan
  • starten
  • startpunt

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

start

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of starten
  2. imperative of starten

German

Verb

start

  1. singular imperative of starten

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English start.

Noun

start m (definite singular starten, indefinite plural starter, definite plural startene)

  1. a start
Derived terms
  • omstart
  • startsted

Etymology 2

Verb

start

  1. imperative of starte

References

  • “start” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

Borrowed from English start.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stɑrt/

Noun

start m (definite singular starten, indefinite plural startar, definite plural startane)

  1. a start (beginning)

Verb

start

  1. imperative of starta

Derived terms

  • omstart

References

  • “start” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Polish

Etymology

Borrowed from English start.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /start/

Noun

start m inan

  1. (sports) start (the beginning of a race)
  2. (aviation) takeoff
    Z niecierpliwością czekałam na start samolotu do Paryża.

    I was impatiently waiting for the plane to Paris to take off. (=for its take-off)
  3. participation
    Większość kibiców ucieszyła się, że zdecydował się on na start w zawodach.

    Most fans were happy to hear that he had decided to take part in the competition.

Declension

Derived terms

  • startować (to start, verb)
  • startowy (tarting, take-off, adjective)
  • falstart m (false start, noun)

Further reading

  • start in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Swedish

Etymology

Borrowed from English start.

Pronunciation

Noun

start c

  1. a start; a beginning (of a race)
  2. the starting (of an engine)

Declension

Derived terms

Related terms

  • starta
  • starter
  • startare

References

  • start in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)

Anagrams

  • ratts, trast

Turkish

Etymology

Borrowed from English start.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [staɾt]
  • Hyphenation: start

Noun

start (definite accusative startı, plural startlar)

  1. start

Usage notes

As Turks are generally not easily spelling consonants at the beginning of a syllable, this word may often be spelled as [sɯtaɾt].

Declension

Antonyms

  • finiş

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