deplore vs reprobate what difference

what is difference between deplore and reprobate

English

Etymology

From Middle French déplorer, from Old French deplorer, from Latin dēplōrāre (to lament over, bewail), from dē- + plōrāre (to wail, weep aloud); origin uncertain.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /dɪˈplɔɹ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /dɪˈplɔː/
  • (rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /dɪˈplo(ː)ɹ/
  • (non-rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /dɪˈploə/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: de‧plore

Verb

deplore (third-person singular simple present deplores, present participle deploring, simple past and past participle deplored)

  1. (transitive) To bewail; to weep bitterly over; to feel sorrow for.
    I deplore my neighbour for having lost his job.
    The UNHCR deplores the recent events in Sudan.
    I deplore not having listened to your advice.
  2. (transitive) To condemn; to express strong disapproval of.
    I deplore how you treated him at the party.
    Many people deplore the actions of the corrupt government.
  3. (obsolete) To regard as hopeless; to give up.
    • 1605, Francis Bacon, Advancement of Learning
      The physicians do make a kind of scruple and religion to stay with the patient after the disease is deplored; whereas, in my judgement, they ought both to inquire the skill, and to give the attendances, for the facilitating and assuaging of the pains and agonies of death.

Synonyms

  • bewail
  • condemn

Related terms

  • deplorable
  • deploration

Translations

Further reading

  • deplore in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • deplore in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • deplore at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • redpole

Spanish

Verb

deplore

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of deplorar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of deplorar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of deplorar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of deplorar.


English

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Latin reprobatus (disapproved, rejected, condemned), past participle of reprobare.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɹɛpɹəbət/

Adjective

reprobate (comparative more reprobate, superlative most reprobate)

  1. (rare) Rejected; cast off as worthless.
    • Reprobate silver shall men call them, because the Lord hath rejected them.
  2. Rejected by God; damned, sinful.
  3. Immoral, having no religious or principled character.
    The reprobate criminal sneered at me.
Translations

Noun

reprobate (plural reprobates)

  1. One rejected by God; a sinful person.
  2. An individual with low morals or principles.
    • c. 1603, Walter Raleigh, Apology for the Voyage to Guiana
      I acknowledge myself for a reprobate, a villain, a traitor to the king.
    • 1920, Herman Cyril McNeile, Bulldog Drummond Chapter 1
      “Good morning, Mrs. Denny,” he said. “Wherefore this worried look on your face? Has that reprobate James been misbehaving himself?”
Related terms
  • depraved
Translations

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Latin reprobare, reprobatus. Doublet of reprove.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɹɛpɹəbeɪt/

Verb

reprobate (third-person singular simple present reprobates, present participle reprobating, simple past and past participle reprobated)

  1. To have strong disapproval of something; to reprove; to condemn.
  2. Of God: to abandon or reject, to deny eternal bliss.
  3. To refuse, set aside.
Translations

Anagrams

  • perborate

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /re.proˈbaː.te/, [ɾɛpɾɔˈbäːt̪ɛ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /re.proˈba.te/, [rɛprɔˈbɑːt̪ɛ]

Verb

reprobāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of reprobō

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