deprive vs divest what difference

what is difference between deprive and divest

English

Alternative forms

  • depryve (obsolete) , deprieve (archaic)

Etymology

From Old French depriver, from Medieval Latin dēprīvō, from Latin + prīvō.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɪˈpɹaɪv/
  • Hyphenation: de‧prive

Verb

deprive (third-person singular simple present deprives, present participle depriving, simple past and past participle deprived)

  1. (transitive) To take something away from (someone) and keep it away; to deny someone something.
    • 2005, Plato, Sophist. Translation by Lesley Brown. 260a.
      If we had been deprived of it, the most serious consequence would be that we’d be deprived of philosophy.
  2. (transitive) To degrade (a clergyman) from office.
  3. (transitive) To bereave.

Synonyms

  • bereave
  • impoverish

Antonyms

  • enrich

Derived terms

  • depriver (agent noun)

Related terms

  • deprivation
  • private
  • privation
  • privy

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • predive, prieved


English

Etymology

Alteration of devest, from Middle French devester (strip of possessions), from Old French desvestir, from des- (dis-) + vestir (to clothe).

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /daɪˈvɛst/, /dɪˈvɛst/
  • Rhymes: -ɛst

Verb

divest (third-person singular simple present divests, present participle divesting, simple past and past participle divested)

  1. (transitive) To strip, deprive, or dispossess (someone) of something (such as a right, passion, privilege, or prejudice).
    Synonyms: deprive, dispossess
  2. (transitive, finance) To sell off or be rid of through sale, especially of a subsidiary.
    Synonym: sell off
    Antonym: invest
    • 2011, Alfred Schipke, Why Do Governments Divest?: The Macroeconomics of Privatization, Springer Science & Business Media (→ISBN), page 6:
      It is argued that from a fiscal point of view, governments should divest only if this leads to an improvement in the intertemporal budget constraint. However, it is shown that policymakers are instead inclined to divest public assets as a means of []
    • 2018, Ravi Kanbur, Henry Shue, Climate Justice: Integrating Economics and Philosophy, Oxford University Press, USA (→ISBN), page 146:
      Building from this argument, we can now turn to arguing the moral case why individuals should divest from fossil fuels. We can flesh out what is wrong with continuing investments in the fossil fuel industry in terms of the role that an agent []
  3. (transitive, archaic) To undress.
    Synonyms: undress, disrobe
    Antonym: dress

Usage notes

In sense “sell off”, stronger than related disinvest, which instead means “reduce or cease new investment”.

Derived terms

  • divestiture
  • divestment

Related terms

  • disinvest

Translations

Anagrams

  • divets, stived

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