deputy vs lieutenant what difference

what is difference between deputy and lieutenant

English

Alternative forms

  • deputee (archaic)

Etymology

From French député, from Late Latin deputatus (appointed).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈdɛpjəti/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈdɛpjəti/, /ˈdɛpəti/

Noun

deputy (plural deputies)

  1. One appointed as the substitute of another, and empowered to act for them, in their name or their behalf; a substitute in office
    Synonyms: lieutenant, representative, delegate, vice, vicegerent
  2. (mining, historical) A person employed to install and remove props, brattices, etc. and to clear gas, for the safety of the miners.
  3. (France): A member of the Chamber of Deputies, formerly called Corps Législatif
  4. (Ireland): a member of Dáil Éireann, or the title of a member of Dáil Éireann. (Normally capitalised in both cases)
    Eamon Ryan is a deputy in the Dáil.
    At today’s meeting, Deputy Ryan will speak on local issues.
  5. (United States): a law enforcement officer who works for the county sheriff’s office; a deputy sheriff or sheriff’s deputy; the entry level rank in such an agency
    The sheriff’s deputies took the suspect into custody.
    Deputy Jones was promoted to corporal today.

Usage notes

Deputy is used in combination with the names of various executive officers, to denote an assistant empowered to act in their name; as, deputy collector, deputy marshal, deputy sheriff. In the British coal mining industry, the word referred to as a deputy overman, which was roughly akin to a foreman in other industries.

Synonyms

  • substitute
  • representative
  • legate
  • delegate
  • envoy
  • agent
  • See also Thesaurus:deputy

Hyponyms

  • vice admiral
  • vice director
  • vicegerent
  • vice president

Derived terms

  • deputy first minister
  • deputy prime minister

Translations

See also

  • vice-

Verb

deputy (third-person singular simple present deputies, present participle deputying, simple past and past participle deputied)

  1. (informal, nonstandard) to deputise

Further reading

  • deputy in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • deputy in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • “deputy” in Roget’s Thesaurus, T. Y. Crowell Co., 1911.


English

Alternative forms

  • leftenant, leftenaunt, lieftenant, lieftenaunt, lieutenaunt (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle French lieutenant, from lieu (place) + tenant (holding). Doublet of locum tenens.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, General Australian, General New Zealand) IPA(key): /lɛfˈtɛnənt/, /ləˈtɛnənt/
    • (UK)
  • (US) IPA(key): /l(j)uˈtɛnənt/
    • (US)
  • (Canada) IPA(key): /l(j)uˈtɛnənt/, /lɛfˈtɛnənt/
    • (Canada)
    • (Canada)
  • (India) IPA(key): /ˈlɛftɛnənt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛnənt

Noun

lieutenant (plural lieutenants)

  1. (military) The lowest Junior Commissioned Officer rank(s) in many military forces, often Army and Marines.
    1. (military, US) In the US Army, Air Force and Marines, holding the rank above Second Lieutenant and below Captain. Both ranks may be referred to as “Lieutenant” or as the complete forms of the ranks.
    2. (military, US, navy) A naval officer whose rank is above that of Ensign in the United States Navy and below that of a Lieutenant Commander. There are two ranks of lieutenant: Lieutenant Junior Grade and Lieutenant.
    3. (military, US) A Commissioned Officer in the United States Coast Guard, Public Health Service, or National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration whose rank is above that of Ensign and below Lieutenant Commander. There are two ranks of lieutenant: Lieutenant Junior Grade and lieutenant.
    4. (military, Britain) A Commissioned Officer in the British Army and Royal Marines, holding the rank above Second Lieutenant and below Captain. Both ranks may be referred to as “Lieutenant,” however “Second Lieutenant” is to specify that the officer is not yet a full Lieutenant.
    5. (military, Britain) A naval officer whose rank is above that of Sub-Lieutenant in the British Navy and below that of a Lieutenant Commander.
    6. (military, Canada, Australia, New Zealand) A naval Commissioned Officer who holds the rank above Sub-Lieutenant and below Lieutenant Commander.
  2. A person who manages or executes the plans and directives of another, more senior person – i.e. a manager to his director.
  3. The second-in-command (2IC) of a group.

Usage notes

When used as a title, it is always capitalised, and frequently abbreviated to Lt.

  • Example: Lieutenant Anne Ward.

The rank of lieutenant corresponds to pay grade O-3 in the US Navy, Coast Guard, Public Health Service, and National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration.

Synonyms

  • (military): Lt., LT., LT, lieut., Lieut., lieut, Lieut (abbreviation)

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • subaltern

Descendants

  • Irish: leifteanant
  • Swahili: luteni

Adjective

lieutenant (not comparable)

  1. A military grade that is junior to the grade the adjective modifies: lieutenant colonel, lieutenant general, lieutenant commander.

Translations

References

  • Lieutenant, World Wide Words

French

Etymology

From lieu +‎ tenant.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ljøt.nɑ̃/

Noun

lieutenant m (plural lieutenants, feminine lieutenante)

  1. lieutenant

Descendants

  • Danish: løjtnant
  • Romansch: litinent

Further reading

  • “lieutenant” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Middle French

Noun

lieutenant m (plural lieutenants)

  1. lieutenant (person who executes the plans and directives of another)

Descendants

  • German: Leutnant, Leutenant
    • Estonian: leitnant
    • Lower Sorbian: leutnant
  • English: lieutenant, leftenant, leftenaunt, lieftenant, lieftenaunt, lieutenaunt
    • Irish: leifteanant
    • Swahili: luteni
  • French: lieutenant
    • Danish: løjtnant
    • Romansch: litinent

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