derive vs educe what difference

what is difference between derive and educe

English

Etymology

From Middle English deriven, from Old French deriver, from Latin dērīvō (to lead, turn, or draw off (a liquid), draw off, derive), from (away) + rīvus (a stream); see rival.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dəˈɹaɪv/

Verb

derive (third-person singular simple present derives, present participle deriving, simple past and past participle derived)

  1. (transitive) To obtain or receive (something) from something else.
  2. (transitive, logic) To deduce (a conclusion) by reasoning.
  3. (transitive, linguistics) To find the derivation of (a word or phrase).
  4. (transitive, chemistry) To create (a compound) from another by means of a reaction.
  5. (intransitive) To originate or stem (from).
  6. To turn the course of (water, etc.); to divert and distribute into subordinate channels.
    • Book 33
      For fear it [water] choke up the pits [] they [the workman] deriue it by other drains.

Derived terms

  • derivation
  • derivative

Translations

Further reading

  • derive in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • derive in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • drivee, reived, revied, rieved

Asturian

Verb

derive

  1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive of derivar

Italian

Noun

derive f pl

  1. plural of deriva

Anagrams

  • rideve, rivede, vedrei

Portuguese

Verb

derive

  1. inflection of derivar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. first/third-person singular imperative

Spanish

Verb

derive

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of derivar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of derivar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of derivar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of derivar.


English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin ēdūcere, present active infinitive of ēdūcō (lead out, raise up); from ex- (out, up) + dūcō (lead, pull).

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɪˈduːs/, /ə-/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɪˈdjuːs/, /ə-/
  • Rhymes: -uːs
  • Hyphenation: e‧duce

Verb

educe (third-person singular simple present educes, present participle educing, simple past and past participle educed)

  1. (transitive, now rare) To direct the course of (a flow, journey etc.); to lead in a particular direction. [from 15th c.]
  2. (transitive) To infer or deduce (a result, theory etc.) from existing data or premises. [from 16th c.]
  3. (transitive) To draw out or bring forth from some basic or potential state; to elicit, to develop. [from 17th c.]
    • 1790, Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Men:
      The justice of God may be vindicated by a belief in a future state; but, only by believing that evil is educing good for the individual, and not for an imaginary whole.
  4. (transitive, chemistry) To isolate (a substance) from a compound; to extract. [from 17th c.]
  5. (transitive) To cause or generate; to bring about. [from 19th c.]

Translations

Noun

educe

  1. An inference.

Anagrams

  • deuce

Italian

Verb

educe

  1. third-person singular present indicative of edurre

Anagrams

  • cedue

Latin

Verb

ēdūce

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of ēdūcō

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [eˈdut͡ʃe]

Verb

educe

  1. third-person singular present subjunctive of educa
  2. third-person plural present subjunctive of educa

Spanish

Verb

educe

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of educir.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of educir.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of educir.

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