desecrate vs outrage what difference

what is difference between desecrate and outrage

English

Etymology

From de- + stem of consecrate.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdɛs.ɪ.kɹeɪ̯t/, /ˈdɛs.ə.kɹeɪ̯t/

Verb

desecrate (third-person singular simple present desecrates, present participle desecrating, simple past and past participle desecrated)

  1. (transitive) To profane or violate the sacredness or sanctity of something.
    • 1916 — James Whitcomb Riley, The Complete Works of James Whitcomb Riley, Volume 10.
      It’s reform — reform! You’re going to ‘turn over a new leaf,’ and all that, and sign the pledge, and quit cigars, and go to work, and pay your debts, and gravitate back into Sunday-school, where you can make love to the preacher’s daughter under the guise of religion, and desecrate the sanctity of the innermost pale of the church by confessions at Class of your ‘thorough conversion’!
  2. (transitive) To remove the consecration from someone or something; to deconsecrate.
  3. (transitive) To change in an inappropriate and destructive manner.
    • 1913 — William Alexander Lambeth and Warren H. Manning, Thomas Jefferson as an Architect and a Designer of Landscapes.
      A subsequent owner has desecrated the main hall and robbed it of its grandeur by putting in a floor just beneath the circular windows in order to make an upper room over the hall.

Synonyms

  • (profane or violate sacredness): defile, unhallow; see also Thesaurus:desecrate
  • (remove the consecration): deconsecrate, desanctify
  • (inappropriately change): pervert

Related terms

  • desecrated
  • desecration
  • desecrative
  • desecrator
  • desecrater

Translations

Adjective

desecrate (comparative more desecrate, superlative most desecrate)

  1. (rare) Desecrated.
    • 1842, Edgar Allan Poe, ‘The Myster of Marie Rogêt’:
      Here are the very nooks where the unwashed most abound—here are the temples most desecrate.

Anagrams

  • decastere


English

Etymology

From Middle English outrage, from Old French outrage, oultrage (excess), from Late Latin *ultrāgium, *ultrāticum (“a going beyond”), derived from Latin ultrā (beyond). Later reanalysed as out- +‎ rage, whence the contemporary pronunciation, though neither of these is etymologically related.

The verb is from Middle English outragen, from Old French oultragier.

Pronunciation

  • (US, UK) IPA(key): /ˈaʊt.ɹeɪd͡ʒ/
  • (General New Zealand) IPA(key): /ˈæot.ɹæed͡ʒ/
  • (obsolete) IPA(key): /ˈaʊt.ɹɪd͡ʒ/

Noun

outrage (countable and uncountable, plural outrages)

  1. An excessively violent or vicious attack; an atrocity.
  2. An offensive, immoral or indecent act.
  3. The resentful, indignant, or shocked anger aroused by such acts.
  4. (obsolete) A destructive rampage. (Can we add an example for this sense?)

Translations

Verb

outrage (third-person singular simple present outrages, present participle outraging, simple past and past participle outraged)

  1. (transitive) To cause or commit an outrage upon; to treat with violence or abuse.
    • August 30, 1706, Francis Atterbury, a sermon preach’d in the Cathedral Church of St. Paul, at the funeral of Mr. Tho. Bennet
      Base and insolent minds [] outrage men when they have Hopes of doing it without a Return.
    • 1725-1726, William Broome, Odyssey
      The interview [] outrages all the rules of decency.
  2. (transitive) To inspire feelings of outrage in.
    The senator’s comments outraged the community.
  3. (archaic, transitive) To sexually violate; to rape.
  4. (obsolete, transitive) To rage in excess of.

Translations

Related terms

  • outrageous

References

Further reading

  • outrage in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • outrage in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

French

Etymology

From Old French oltrage

Pronunciation

Noun

outrage m (plural outrages)

  1. offence, insult, contempt
  2. (literary) onslaught

Verb

outrage

  1. first-person singular present indicative of outrager
  2. third-person singular present indicative of outrager
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of outrager
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of outrager
  5. second-person singular imperative of outrager

Further reading

  • “outrage” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

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