designate vs specify what difference

what is difference between designate and specify

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin designatus, past participle of designare. Doublet of design.

Pronunciation

  • (adjective) (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈdɛzɪɡ.nət/, /ˈdɛzɪɡ.neɪt/
  • (verb) (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈdɛzɪɡ.neɪt/

Adjective

designate (not comparable)

  1. Designated; appointed; chosen.
  2. (Britain) Used after a role title to indicate that the person has been selected but has yet to take up the role.
    • 1619, George Buck, The History of King Richard the Third
      King designate

Verb

designate (third-person singular simple present designates, present participle designating, simple past and past participle designated)

  1. To mark out and make known; to point out; to indicate; to show; to distinguish by marks or description
  2. To call by a distinctive title; to name.
  3. To indicate or set apart for a purpose or duty; — with to or for; to designate an officer for or to the command of a post or station.

Synonyms

  • (mark out and make known): denote, describe, indicate, note
  • (call by a distinctive title): denominate, entitle, name, style; see also Thesaurus:denominate
  • (set apart for a purpose or duty): allocate, earmark; see also Thesaurus:set apart

Derived terms

  • designated driver
  • designated hitter

Related terms

  • codesignative
  • designation
  • designative
  • designatum

Translations

Further reading

  • designate in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • designate in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Interlingua

Participle

designate

  1. past participle of designar

Italian

Verb

designate

  1. second-person plural present and imperative of designare
  2. feminine plural of designato

Adjective

designate

  1. feminine plural of designato

Anagrams

  • disegnate, sdegniate

Latin

Verb

dēsignāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of dēsignō

References

  • designate in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • designate in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette


English

Etymology

From Middle English specifien, from Old French specifier, especefier, or directly from Medieval Latin specificō, from specificus (specific).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈspɛs.ɪ.faɪ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈspɛs.əˌfaɪ/
  • Hyphenation: spe‧ci‧fy

Verb

specify (third-person singular simple present specifies, present participle specifying, simple past and past participle specified)

  1. (transitive) To state explicitly, or in detail, or as a condition.
  2. (transitive) To include in a specification.
  3. (transitive) To bring about a specific result.
  4. (intransitive, obsolete) To speak explicitly or in detail (often used with of).

Synonyms

  • explicitize
  • disambiguate

Derived terms

  • above-specified

Related terms

  • specifiable
  • specific
  • specification

Translations


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