despoiler vs spoiler what difference

what is difference between despoiler and spoiler

English

Etymology

despoil +‎ -er

Noun

despoiler (plural despoilers)

  1. One who despoils; one who strips by force; a plunderer.
    • 1881, Rosa Campbell Praed, Policy and Passion, Chapter 30,[1]
      A wild and unreasoning craving for vengeance took possession of Ferris’s soul. Passing by the real despoiler of Angela’s peace, it clamoured like an evil spirit against the man from whom he had received benefits, which his distorted imagination construed into insults.
    • 1985, Stephen Jay Gould, The Flamingo’s Smile: Reflections in Natural History, New York: Norton, 1987, Chapter 1,[2]
      Other despoilers of our natural heritage killed bison with even greater abandon, removed the tongue only (considered a great delicacy in some quarters), and left the rest of the carcass to rot.

References

  • despoiler in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • leprosied, spoilered


English

Etymology

From spoil +‎ -er.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈspɔɪ.lə/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈspɔɪ.lɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ɔɪlə(ɹ)

Noun

spoiler (plural spoilers)

  1. One who spoils; a plunderer; a pillager; a robber; a despoiler.
  2. One who corrupts, mars, or renders useless.
  3. A document, review or comment that discloses the ending or some key surprise or twist in a story, or the internal rules controlling the behaviour of a video game, etc.
    Good netiquette dictates that one warn of spoilers before discussing them, so that readers who wish to do so may experience the surprises for themselves.
  4. (aeronautics) A device to reduce lift and increase drag.
  5. (automobiles) A device to reduce lift and increase downforce.
  6. (US, chiefly politics, sports) An individual (or organisation etc.), unable to win themselves, who spoils the chances of another’s victory.
    • 1994, Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom, Abacus 2010, p. 713:
      The optimism at the opening of the talks could not be dampened even by a few spoilers.

Derived terms

  • spoiler alert
  • spoiler effect
  • spoilerific
  • spoileron
  • spoiler space
  • spoilery

Translations

Verb

spoiler (third-person singular simple present spoilers, present participle spoilering, simple past and past participle spoilered)

  1. (transitive, fandom slang) To mark (a document or message) with a spoiler warning, to prevent readers from accidentally learning details they would prefer not to know.
  2. (transitive, fandom slang) To tell (a person) details of how a story ends etc.
    I’ve been spoilered, so I doubt I’ll be able to enjoy the final episode.

Further reading

  • Spoiler (disambiguation) on the English Wikipedia. English Wikipedia
  • Spoiler (media) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Spoiler (aeronautics) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Spoiler (automotive) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Spoiler effect on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • slopier

Portuguese

Etymology

From English spoiler.

Noun

spoiler m (plural spoilers)

  1. spoiler (document, review or comment that discloses the ending or some key surprise or twist in a story)

Spanish

Etymology

From English spoiler.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈspoileɾ/, [ˈspoi̯.leɾ]
  • IPA(key): /esˈpoileɾ/, [esˈpoi̯.leɾ]

Noun

spoiler m (plural spoilers or spoiler)

  1. spoiler (document, review or comment that discloses the ending or some key surprise or twist in a story)

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