determine vs shape what difference

what is difference between determine and shape

English

Alternative forms

  • determin (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English determinen, from Old French determiner, French déterminer, from Latin determināre (to bound, limit, prescribe, fix, determine), from de + termināre (to limit), from terminus (bound, limit, end).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /dɪˈtɜːmɪn/
  • (US) IPA(key): /dɪˈtɝmɪn/

Verb

determine (third-person singular simple present determines, present participle determining, simple past and past participle determined)

  1. To set the boundaries or limits of.
  2. To ascertain definitely; to figure out, find out, or conclude by analyzing, calculating, or investigating.
  3. To fix the form or character of; to shape; to prescribe imperatively; to regulate; to settle.
    • 1975, Saul Bellow, Humboldt’s Gift [Avon ed., 1976, p. 259]:
      These dramas may appear purely internal but they are perhaps economically determined … when people think they are being so subtly inventive or creative they merely reflect society’s general need for economic growth.
  4. To fix the course of; to impel and direct; with a remoter object preceded by to.
  5. To bring to a conclusion, as a question or controversy; to settle authoritative or judicial sentence; to decide.
  6. To resolve (to do something); to establish a fixed intention; to cause (something) to come to a conclusion or decision; to lead.
  7. (logic) To define or limit by adding a differentia.
  8. (obsolete) To bring to an end; to finish.

Derived terms

Translations

Further reading

  • determine in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • determine in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • determine at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • “determine” in Raymond Williams, Keywords (revised), 1983, Fontana Press, page 98.

Anagrams

  • intermede, nemertide

Galician

Verb

determine

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of determinar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of determinar

Ladin

Verb

determine

  1. first-person singular present indicative of determiner
  2. first-person singular present subjunctive of determiner
  3. third-person singular present subjunctive of determiner
  4. third-person plural present subjunctive of determiner

Portuguese

Verb

determine

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of determinar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of determinar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of determinar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of determinar

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [deˈtermine]

Verb

determine

  1. third-person singular present subjunctive of determina
  2. third-person plural present subjunctive of determina

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /deteɾˈmine/, [d̪e.t̪eɾˈmi.ne]

Verb

determine

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of determinar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of determinar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of determinar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of determinar.


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: shāp, IPA(key): /ʃeɪp/
  • Rhymes: -eɪp

Etymology

From Middle English shap, schape, from Old English ġesceap (shape, form, created being, creature, creation, dispensation, fate, condition, sex, gender, genitalia), from Proto-West Germanic *ga- + *skap, from Proto-Germanic *ga- + *skapą (shape, nature, condition), possibly from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kep- (to split, cut). Cognate with Middle Dutch schap (form), Middle High German geschaf (creature), Icelandic skap (state, condition, temper, mood).

The verb is from Middle English shapen, schapen, from Old English scieppan (to shape, form, make, create, assign, arrange, destine, order, adjudge), from Proto-Germanic *skapjaną (to create), from the noun. Cognate with Dutch scheppen, German schaffen, Swedish skapa (create, make), Norwegian skapa (create).

Noun

shape (countable and uncountable, plural shapes)

  1. The status or condition of something
    The used bookshop wouldn’t offer much due to the poor shape of the book.
  2. Condition of personal health, especially muscular health.
    The vet checked to see what kind of shape the animal was in.
    We exercise to keep in good physical shape.
  3. The appearance of something in terms of its arrangement in space, especially its outline; often a basic geometric two-dimensional figure.
    He cut a square shape out of the cake.
    What shape shall we use for the cookies? Stars, circles, or diamonds?
  4. Form; formation.
    • 2006, Berdj Kenadjian, Martin Zakarian, From Darkness to Light:
      What if God’s plans and actions do mold the shape of human events?
  5. (iron manufacture) A rolled or hammered piece, such as a bar, beam, angle iron, etc., having a cross section different from merchant bar.
  6. (iron manufacture) A piece which has been roughly forged nearly to the form it will receive when completely forged or fitted.
  7. (cooking, now rare) A mould for making jelly, blancmange etc., or a piece of such food formed moulded into a particular shape.
    • 1918, Rebecca West, The Return of the Soldier, Virago 2014, page 74:
      ‘And if I’m late for supper there’s a dish of macaroni cheese you must put in the oven and a tin of tomatoes to eat with it. And there’s a little rhubarb and shape.’
    • 1978, Jane Gardam, God on the Rocks, Abacus 2014, p. 111:
      It was brawn and shape for high tea.
  8. (gambling) A loaded die.
    • 1961, United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Government Operations. Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, Gambling and Organized Crime: Hearings (page 76)
      A top cheater seldom ever uses shapes or loaded dice because they do not assure you of winning.
  9. (programming) In the Hack programming language, a group of data fields each of which has a name and a data type.

Hyponyms

  • See also Thesaurus:shape

Hyponyms

  • contest shape

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

See also

  • Appendix:Forms and shapes

Verb

shape (third-person singular simple present shapes, present participle shaping, simple past shaped or (obsolete) shope, past participle shaped or (archaic) shapen)

  1. (Northern England, Scotland, rare) To create or make.
    • 1685, Satan’s Invisible World Discoveredː
      Which the mighty God of heaven shope.
  2. (transitive) To give something a shape and definition.
    • 1932, The American Scholar, page 227, United Chapters of Phi Beta Kappa
      The professor never pretended to the academic prerogative of forcing his students into his own channels of reasoning; he entered into and helped shape the discussion but above all he made his men learn to think for themselves and rely upon their own intellectual judgments.
  3. To form or manipulate something into a certain shape.
  4. (of a country, person, etc) To give influence to.
  5. To suit; to be adjusted or conformable.
  6. (obsolete) To imagine; to conceive.

Synonyms

  • (give shape): form, mold, (rare) shapen

Derived terms

  • beshape
  • foreshape
  • forshape
  • misshape
  • overshape
  • shape up

Translations

References

  • The Dictionary of the Scots Language
  • shape in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • shape at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • HEPAs, Heaps, ephas, heaps, phase

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