detest vs hate what difference

what is difference between detest and hate

English

Etymology

From Middle French detester, from Latin detestari (to imprecate evil while calling the gods to witness”, “denounce”, “hate intensely), from de- + testari (to testify, bear witness), from testis (a witness); see test, testify.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɪˈtɛst/
  • Hyphenation: de‧test

Verb

detest (third-person singular simple present detests, present participle detesting, simple past and past participle detested)

  1. (transitive) To dislike (someone or something) intensely; to loathe.
    I detest snakes.
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To witness against; to denounce; to condemn.
    • The heresy of Nestorius [] was detested in the Eastern churches.
    • 1545, John Bale, The Image of Both Churches
      God hath detested them with his own mouth.

Usage notes

  • This is a catenative verb that takes the gerund (-ing). See Appendix:English catenative verbs

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:hate

Related terms

  • detestable
  • detestation

Translations

See also

  • abhor
  • despise
  • disdain
  • dislike
  • hate
  • loathe

Further reading

  • detest in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • detest in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • dettes, setted, tested


English

Etymology

From Middle English hate (noun), probably from Old English hatian (to hate, verb) and/or Old Norse hatr (hate, noun). Merged with Middle English hete, hæte, heate (hate), from Old English hete, from Proto-Germanic *hataz (hatred, hate), from Proto-Indo-European *keh₂d- (strong emotion). Cognate with West Frisian haat, Dutch haat, German Hass, Norwegian and Swedish hat.

The verb is from Middle English haten, from Old English hatian (to hate, treat as an enemy), from Proto-Germanic *hatāną (to hate), from Proto-Germanic *hataz, from the same root as above.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /heɪt/
  • Rhymes: -eɪt

Noun

hate (countable and uncountable, plural hates)

  1. An object of hatred.
    One of my pet hates is traffic wardens.
  2. Hatred.
    He gave me a look filled with pure hate.
  3. (Internet slang) Negative feedback, abusive behaviour.
    There was a lot of hate in the comments on my vlog about Justin Bieber from his fans.

Derived terms

  • hate crime
  • love-hate

Related terms

  • hatel
  • hatred

Descendants

  • Polish: hejt

Translations

Verb

hate (third-person singular simple present hates, present participle hating, simple past and past participle hated)

  1. (transitive) To dislike intensely or greatly.
    • 1997, Popular Science (volume 251, number 4, page 34)
      People who hate broccoli may have super-sensitive taste buds.
  2. (intransitive) To experience hatred.
    Do not fear; he who fears hates; he who hates kills. — attributed to Gandhi
  3. (informal, originally African-American Vernacular) Used in a phrasal verb: hate on.

Conjugation

Usage notes

  • This is generally a stative verb that is rarely used in the continuous (progressive) aspect. See Category:English stative verbs

Synonyms

  • (to dislike intensely): See Thesaurus:hate

Antonyms

  • (to dislike intensely): See Thesaurus:love

Derived terms

  • forehate
  • hater

Translations

Anagrams

  • HEAT, Thea, eath, haet, heat, heta

Bola

Noun

hate

  1. liver

References

  • Brent Wiebe, Bola (Bola-Bakovi) Language Organized Phonology Data, p. 2

Cia-Cia

Alternative forms

  • 하떼

Etymology

From Proto-Celebic *qate, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *qatay, from Proto-Austronesian *qaCay.

Noun

hate (Hangul spelling 하떼)

  1. (anatomy) liver (organ of the body)

References

  • Van den Berg, Rene (1991). “Preliminary Notes on the Cia-Cia Language,” in Excursies in Celebes, pp. 305-324.

Dutch

Pronunciation

Verb

hate

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of haten

Japanese

Romanization

hate

  1. Rōmaji transcription of はて

Middle English

Etymology 1

From earlier hete (from Old English hete, from Proto-Germanic *hataz), influenced by haten.

Alternative forms

  • haate, hatte, hat, ate

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhaːt(ə)/

Noun

hate (plural hates)

  1. Hate, hatred, anger, wroth.
  2. Something that causes or induces hate; insults, demeaning words.
  3. The results of hate; enmity, discord, turmoil.
  4. (rare) Something that one hates.
Related terms
  • hateful
  • hatel
  • hateliche
  • haten
  • hatere
  • hatesum
  • hatfully
  • hatrede
  • hatyng
Descendants
  • English: hate
  • Scots: hate, hait, heit
References
  • “hāte, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-07-18.

Etymology 2

Verb

hate

  1. Alternative form of haten

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse hata

Verb

hate (imperative hat, present tense hater, passive hates, simple past and past participle hata or hatet, present participle hatende)

  1. to hate (somebody / something)

Related terms

  • hat (noun)

References

  • “hate” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Alternative forms

  • hata

Etymology

From Old Norse hata

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /²hɑːtə/

Verb

hate (present tense hatar, past tense hata, past participle hata, passive infinitive hatast, present participle hatande, imperative hat)

  1. to hate (someone, something)

Related terms

  • hat (noun)

References

  • “hate” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Unami

Verb

hate

  1. there is, there exists

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