detriment vs hurt what difference

what is difference between detriment and hurt

English

Etymology

From Old French detriement, from Latin detrimentum (loss, damage, literally a rubbing off), from deterere (to rub off, wear), from de- (down, away) + terere (to rub).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdɛtɹɪmənt/

Noun

detriment (countable and uncountable, plural detriments)

  1. Harm, hurt, damage.
  2. (Britain, obsolete) A charge made to students and barristers for incidental repairs of the rooms they occupy.

Usage notes

  • Often used in the form “to someone’s detriment”.

Synonyms

  • harm
  • hurt
  • illfare
  • damage
  • expense

Antonyms

  • benefit

Derived terms

  • detrimental

Translations

Verb

detriment (third-person singular simple present detriments, present participle detrimenting, simple past and past participle detrimented)

  1. (transitive, chiefly obsolete) To be detrimental to; to harm or mar.

Further reading

  • detriment in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • detriment in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Romanian

Etymology

From French détriment, from Latin detrimentum.

Noun

detriment n (uncountable)

  1. detriment

Declension



English

Etymology

From Middle English hurten, hirten, hertan (to injure, scathe, knock together), from Old Northern French hurter (“to ram into, strike, collide with”; > Modern French heurter), perhaps from Frankish *hūrt (a battering ram), from Proto-Germanic *hrūtaną, *hreutaną (to fall, beat), from Proto-Indo-European *krew- (to fall, beat, smash, strike, break); however, the earliest instances of the verb in Middle English are as old as those found in Old French, which leads to the possibility that the Middle English word may instead be a reflex of an unrecorded Old English *hȳrtan, which later merged with the Old French verb. Germanic cognates include Dutch horten (to push against, strike), Middle Low German hurten (to run at, collide with), Middle High German hurten (to push, bump, attack, storm, invade), Old Norse hrútr (battering ram).

Alternate etymology traces Old Northern French hurter rather to Old Norse hrútr (ram (male sheep)), lengthened-grade variant of hjǫrtr (stag), from Proto-Germanic *herutuz, *herutaz (hart, male deer), which would relate it to English hart (male deer). See hart.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: hû(r)t, IPA(key): /hɜːt/
  • (General American) enPR: hûrt, IPA(key): /hɝt/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)t

Verb

hurt (third-person singular simple present hurts, present participle hurting, simple past and past participle hurt)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To cause (a person or animal) physical pain and/or injury.
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To cause (somebody) emotional pain.
    He was deeply hurt he hadn’t been invited.
    The insult hurt.
  3. (intransitive) To be painful.
  4. (transitive, intransitive) To damage, harm, impair, undermine, impede.
    Copying and pasting identical portions of source code hurts maintainability, because the programmer has to keep all those copies synchronized.
    Every little hurts.

Synonyms

  • (to be painful): smart
  • (to cause physical pain and/or injury): wound, injure, dere

Derived terms

  • hurtle
  • wouldn’t hurt a fly

Translations

See also

  • ache

Adjective

hurt (comparative more hurt, superlative most hurt)

  1. Wounded, physically injured.
  2. Pained.

Synonyms

  • (wounded): imbrued, injured, wounded; see also Thesaurus:wounded
  • (pained): aching, sore, suffering

Translations

Noun

hurt (plural hurts)

  1. An emotional or psychological humiliation or bad experience.
  2. (archaic) A bodily injury causing pain; a wound or bruise.
    • 1605, Shakespeare, King Lear vii
      I have received a hurt.
    • The cause is a temperate conglutination ; for both bodies are clammy and viscous , and do bridle the deflux of humours to the hurts , without penning them in too much
    • The pains of sickness and hurts [] all men feel.
  3. (archaic) injury; damage; detriment; harm
  4. (heraldry) A roundel azure (blue circular spot).
  5. (engineering) A band on a trip-hammer helve, bearing the trunnions.
  6. A husk.

Translations

Related terms

  • hurty

References

Anagrams

  • Ruth, Thur, ruth, thru, thur

German

Verb

hurt

  1. inflection of huren:
    1. third-person singular present
    2. second-person plural present
    3. plural imperative

Polish

Etymology

From Middle High German hurt.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /xurt/

Noun

hurt m inan

  1. wholesale

Declension

Derived terms

  • (adjective) hurtowy
  • (nouns) hurtownia, hurtownik

Further reading

  • hurt in Polish dictionaries at PWN

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