dinge vs dinginess what difference

what is difference between dinge and dinginess

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɪndʒ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪndʒ

Etymology 1

From dingy.

Noun

dinge (plural dinges)

  1. Dinginess.
  2. (US slang, dated) A black person.
    • 1940, Raymond Chandler, Farewell, My Lovely, Penguin 2010 p. 3:
      ‘A dinge,’ he said. ‘I just thrown him out. You seen me throw him out?’
    • 1970, John Glassco, Memoirs of Montparnasse, New York 2007, p. 46:
      ‘You made a hit with the dinge,’ Bob was saying.
Derived terms
  • dinge queen

Etymology 2

From Middle English dengen, from Old English denġan, denċġan, from Proto-Germanic *dangijaną (to beat, hit).

Verb

dinge (third-person singular simple present dinges, present participle dingeing, simple past and past participle dinged)

  1. to strike, scourge, beat; indent, bruise, knock in
  2. to flog, as in penance
Derived terms
  • dinged-up

Anagrams

  • Edgin, deign, digne, gnide, nidge

Afrikaans

Noun

dinge

  1. plural of ding

Dutch

Verb

dinge

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of dingen

Irish

Noun

dinge f

  1. genitive singular of ding (wedge; thickset person)

Noun

dinge f

  1. genitive singular of ding (dint)

Mutation


English

Etymology

dingy +‎ -ness

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈdɪndʒɪnəs/

Noun

dinginess (usually uncountable, plural dinginesses)

  1. The state or quality of being dingy.
    • 1844, Charles Dickens, Martin Chuzzlewit, London: Chapman & Hall, Chapter Four, p. 34,[1]
      His nether garments were of a blueish gray—violent in its colours once, but sobered now by age and dinginess—and were so stretched and strained in a tough conflict between his braces and his straps, that they appeared every moment in danger of flying asunder at the knees.
    • 1875, Henry James, A Passionate Pilgrim, Boston: James R. Osgood & Co., Chapter 2, p. 110,[2]
      He was a pitiful image of shabby gentility and the dinginess of “reduced circumstances.”
    • 1918, Booth Tarkington, The Magnificent Ambersons, Garden City: Doubleday, Page & Co., Chapter 31, p. 437,[3]
      The streets were thunderous; a vast energy heaved under the universal coating of dinginess.

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