Discount vs Saving what difference

what is difference between Discount and Saving

English

Etymology

Alteration of French descompte, décompte, from Old French disconter, desconter (reckon off, account back, discount), from Medieval Latin discomputō (I deduct, discount), from Latin dis- (away) + computō (I reckon, count).

Pronunciation

  • Verb:
    • (in some senses) enPR: dĭskountʹ, IPA(key): /dɪsˈkaʊnt/
    • (in some senses) enPR: dĭsʹkount, IPA(key): /ˈdɪskaʊnt/
  • Noun and adjective:
    • enPR: dĭsʹkount, IPA(key): /ˈdɪskaʊnt/
  • Rhymes: -aʊnt

Verb

discount (third-person singular simple present discounts, present participle discounting, simple past and past participle discounted)

  1. To deduct from an account, debt, charge, and the like.
    Merchants sometimes discount five or six per cent for prompt payment of bills.
  2. To lend money upon, deducting the discount or allowance for interest
    • 1692, William Walsh, Letter on the present state of the Currency of Great Britain
      Discount only unexceptionable paper.
  3. To take into consideration beforehand; to anticipate and form conclusions concerning (an event).
  4. To leave out of account or regard as unimportant.
    • Of the three opinions, (I discount Brown’s), under this head, one supposes that the law of Causality is a positive affirmation, and a primary fact of thought, incapable of all further analysis.
    They discounted his comments.
  5. To lend, or make a practice of lending, money, abating the discount
  6. (psychology, transactional analysis) To believe, or act as though one believes, that one’s own feelings are more important than the reality of a situation.

Translations

Noun

discount (plural discounts)

  1. A reduction in price.
    This store offers discounts on all its wares. That store specializes in discount wares, too.
  2. (finance) A deduction made for interest, in advancing money upon, or purchasing, a bill or note not due; payment in advance of interest upon money.
  3. The rate of interest charged in discounting.
  4. (psychology, transactional analysis) The act of one who believes, or act as though they believe, that their own feelings are more important than the reality of a situation.

Synonyms

  • (reduction in price): rebate, reduction

Antonyms

  • surcharge

Derived terms

  • discountable
  • quantity discount
  • rediscount

Descendants

  • German: Discount

Translations

Adjective

discount (not comparable)

  1. (of a store) Specializing in selling goods at reduced prices.
    If you’re looking for cheap clothes, there’s a discount clothier around the corner.

Further reading

  • discount in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • discount in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • discount at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • conduits, ductions, noctuids

Italian

Etymology

From English discount.

Noun

discount m (invariable)

  1. discount store


English

Etymology

From save +‎ -ing.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈseɪv.ɪŋ/
  • Rhymes: -eɪvɪŋ

Noun

saving (countable and uncountable, plural savings)

  1. A reduction in cost or expenditure.
  2. (countable, usually in the plural) Something (usually money) that is saved, particularly money that has been set aside for the future.
  3. (uncountable) The action of the verb to save.
  4. (law, obsolete) Exception; reservation.

Derived terms

  • cost saving
  • life savings

Translations

Verb

saving

  1. present participle of save

Adjective

saving (comparative more saving, superlative most saving)

  1. (theology) That saves someone from damnation; redemptive. [from 14th c.]
  2. Preserving; rescuing.
    • He is the saving strength of his anointed.
  3. Thrifty; frugal. [from 15th c.]
    a saving cook
    • 1932, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Sunset Song, Polygon 2006 (A Scots Quair), p. 14:
      Three of her bairns were drowned at sea, fishing off the Bervie braes they had been, but the fourth, the boy Cospatric, him that died the same day as the Old Queen, he was douce and saving and sensible, and set putting the estate to rights.
  4. Bringing back in returns or in receipts the sum expended; incurring no loss, though not gainful.
    a saving bargain
    The ship has made a saving voyage.
  5. Making reservation or exception.
    a saving clause
  6. (in compound adjectives) Relating to making a saving.

Derived terms

  • cost-saving
  • space-saving
  • timesaving
  • saving grace

Preposition

saving

  1. With the exception of; except; save.
    • And in the stone a new name written, which no man knoweth saving he that receiveth it.
  2. Without disrespect to.
    • a. 1796, Robert Burns, The Carle of Kellyburn Braes
      Saving your presence.

Anagrams

  • Givans, vignas

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