discover vs expose what difference

what is difference between discover and expose

English

Alternative forms

  • discovre (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English discoveren, from Old French descovrir, from Late Latin discoperīre < discooperiō, discooperīre, from Latin dis- + cooperiō.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /dɪsˈkʌvə/
  • (Northern England) IPA(key): /dɪsˈkʊvə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /dɪsˈkʌvɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ʌvə(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: dis‧cov‧er

Verb

discover (third-person singular simple present discovers, present participle discovering, simple past and past participle discovered)

  1. To find or learn something for the first time.
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To remove the cover from; to uncover (a head, building etc.).
    • 1953, Samuel Beckett, Watt
      He set down his bags beside him, on the beautiful red floor, and he took off his hat, for he had reached his destination, discovering his scant red hair, and laid it on the table beside him.
  3. (transitive, now rare) To expose, uncover.
  4. (transitive, chess) To create by moving a piece out of another piece’s line of attack.
  5. (law, transitive) To question (a person) as part of discovery in a lawsuit.
  6. (transitive, archaic) To reveal (information); to divulge, make known.
    • 1625, Francis Bacon, Of Adversity
      Prosperity doth best discover vice; but adversity doth best discover virtue.
  7. (transitive, obsolete) To reconnoitre, explore (an area).
    • they seyde the same, and were aggreed that Sir Clegis, Sir Claryon, and Sir Clement the noble, that they sholde dyscover the woodys, bothe the dalys and the downys.
  8. (obsolete) To manifest without design; to show; to exhibit.
    • 1871, Charles John Smith}}, Synonyms Discriminated
      The youth discovered a taste for sculpture.

Synonyms

  • (expose something previously covered): expose, reveal, uncover
  • (find something for the first time): come across, find

Antonyms

  • (expose something previously covered): conceal, cover, cover up, hide

Derived terms

  • discovery
  • discovered attack
  • discovered check

Translations

See also

  • invent
  • detect
  • find
  • stumble upon

Anagrams

  • codrives, discovre, divorces, divorcés


English

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French exposer (to lay open, set forth), from Latin expōnō (set forth), with contamination from poser (to lay, place). Doublet of expound, via Old French espondre (to set forth, explain), from the same Latin term.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɪkˈspəʊz/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɪkˈspoʊz/, /ɛkˈspoʊz/
  • Rhymes: -əʊz

Verb

expose (third-person singular simple present exposes, present participle exposing, simple past and past participle exposed)

  1. (transitive) To reveal, uncover, make visible, bring to light, introduce to.
  2. (transitive) To subject photographic film to light thereby recording an image.
  3. (transitive) To abandon, especially an unwanted baby in the wilderness.
    • 1893, Fridtjof Nansen, Eskimo Life, page 152:
      This they do, as a rule, by exposing the child or throwing it into the sea.
  4. To submit to an active (mostly dangerous) substance like an allergen, ozone, nicotine, solvent, or to any other stress, in order to test the reaction, resistance, etc.
  5. (computing, transitive) To make available to other parts of a program, or to other programs.
    • 2000, Robert C. Martin, More C++ Gems (page 266)
      In the OO world, the word is to hide the structure of the data, and expose only functionality. OO designers expose an object to the world in terms of the services it provides.

Synonyms

  • (to reveal): bare, nake; see Thesaurus:reveal
    • (a hidden aspect of one’s character): bewray
    • (to remove clothing): doff; see Thesaurus:undress

Derived terms

  • expose oneself
  • exposure
  • exposition

Translations


French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛk.spoz/

Verb

expose

  1. first-person singular present indicative of exposer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of exposer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of exposer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of exposer
  5. second-person singular imperative of exposer

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