disgorge vs spill what difference

what is difference between disgorge and spill

English

Etymology

From Middle French desgorger.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /dɪsˈɡɔːdʒ/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)dʒ

Verb

disgorge (third-person singular simple present disgorges, present participle disgorging, simple past and past participle disgorged)

  1. To vomit or spew, to discharge.
    • 1598-1600, Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voiages, Traffiques and Discoueries of the English Nation
      This mountain when it rageth [] casteth forth huge stones, disgorgeth brimstone.
    • They loudly laughed / To see his heaving breast disgorge the briny draught.
  2. To surrender (stolen goods or money, for example) unwillingly.
  3. (oenology) To remove traces of yeast from sparkling wine by the méthode champenoise.

Derived terms

  • disgorgement

Related terms

  • gorge
  • engorge

Translations

See also

  • regurgitate

Anagrams

  • geogrids


English

Etymology

From Middle English spillen, from Old English spillan, spildan (to kill, destroy, waste), from Proto-West Germanic *spilþijan, from Proto-Germanic *spilþijaną (to spoil, kill, murder), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)pel- (to sunder, split, rend, tear).

Cognate with Dutch spillen (to use needlessly, waste), French gaspiller (“to waste, squander” < Germanic), Bavarian spillen (to split, cleave, splinter), Danish spille (to spill, waste), Swedish spilla (to spill, waste), Icelandic spilla (to contaminate, spoil).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /spɪl/
  • Rhymes: -ɪl

Verb

spill (third-person singular simple present spills, present participle spilling, simple past and past participle spilled or spilt)

  1. (transitive) To drop something so that it spreads out or makes a mess; to accidentally pour.
  2. (intransitive) To spread out or fall out, as above.
    • He was so topful of himself, that he let it spill on all the company.
  3. (transitive) To drop something that was intended to be caught.
  4. To mar; to damage; to destroy by misuse; to waste.
    • 1589, George Puttenham, The Arte of English Poesie
      They [the colours] disfigure the stuff and spill the whole workmanship.
    • Spill not the morning (the quintessence of day) in recreations.
  5. (obsolete, intransitive) To be destroyed, ruined, or wasted; to come to ruin; to perish; to waste.
    • That thou wilt suffer innocence to spill.
  6. (transitive) To cause to flow out and be lost or wasted; to shed.
    • 1665, John Dryden, The Indian Emperour
      to revenge his blood so justly spilt
  7. (transitive, slang, obsolete) To cause to be thrown from a mount, a carriage, etc.
    • 2007, Eric Flint, ‎David Weber, 1634: The Baltic War
      Then, not thirty feet beyond, a sudden panicky lunge to the side by his horse spilled him from the saddle.
  8. To cover or decorate with slender pieces of wood, metal, ivory, etc.; to inlay.
  9. (nautical) To relieve a sail from the pressure of the wind, so that it can be more easily reefed or furled, or to lessen the strain.
  10. (transitive, Australian politics) To open the leadership of a parliamentary party for re-election.
  11. (transitive) To reveal information to an uninformed party.
  12. (of a knot) To come undone.

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

spill (plural spills)

  1. (countable) A mess of something that has been dropped.
  2. A fall or stumble.
    The bruise is from a bad spill he had last week.
  3. A small stick or piece of paper used to light a candle, cigarette etc by the transfer of a flame from a fire.
    • 2008, Elizabeth Bear, Ink and Steel: A Novel of the Promethean Age:
      Kit froze with the pipe between his teeth, the relit spill pressed to the weed within it.
  4. A slender piece of anything.
    1. A peg or pin for plugging a hole, as in a cask; a spile.
    2. A metallic rod or pin.
  5. (mining) One of the thick laths or poles driven horizontally ahead of the main timbering in advancing a level in loose ground.
  6. (sound recording) The situation where sound is picked up by a microphone from a source other than that which is intended.
  7. (obsolete) A small sum of money.
    • 1726, John Ayliffe, Parergon juris canonici Anglicani
      Spill or Sportule for the same from the credulous Laity
  8. (Australian politics) A declaration that the leadership of a parliamentary party is vacant, and open for re-election. Short form of leadership spill.

Quotations

  • For quotations using this term, see Citations:spill.

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • pills

Gothic

Romanization

spill

  1. Romanization of ????????????????????

Luxembourgish

Verb

spill

  1. second-person singular imperative of spillen

Middle English

Etymology

From Old English spillan.

Verb

spill

  1. Alternative form of spillen

Norwegian Bokmål

Alternative forms

  • spell

Etymology 1

From the verb spille

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /spɪl/
  • Rhymes: -ɪl

Noun

spill n (definite singular spillet, indefinite plural spill, definite plural spilla or spillene)

  1. a game (or part of a game, e.g., a hand, a round); equipment for a game (e.g., deck of cards, set of dice, board, men, pieces, etc.)
  2. play, playing
    ballen er ute av spill – the ball is out of play
  3. gambling; card-playing
  4. musical instrument (in compounds such as trekkspill (accordion))
  5. stage play
  6. flickering, play, sparkling (of flames, lights, colors, eyes, a smile)
Derived terms

See also

  • spel (Nynorsk)

Etymology 2

Verb

spill

  1. imperative of spille

References

  • “spill” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Swedish

Noun

spill n

  1. waste, unusable surplus material
  2. a spill (a mess of something spilled, dropped or leaked)

Declension

Verb

spill

  1. imperative of spilla.

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