disgust vs revolt what difference

what is difference between disgust and revolt

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French desgouster, from Old French desgouster (to put off one’s appetite), from des- (dis-) + gouster, goster (to taste), from Latin gustus (a tasting).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: dĭs-gŭstʹ
  • IPA(key): /dɪsˈɡʌst/, [dɪsˈkʌst]
  • Rhymes: -ʌst
  • Hyphenation: dis‧gust
  • Homophone: discussed

Verb

disgust (third-person singular simple present disgusts, present participle disgusting, simple past and past participle disgusted)

  1. To cause an intense dislike for something.
    • 1874, Marcus Clarke, For the Term of His Natural Life Chapter V
      It is impossible to convey, in words, any idea of the hideous phantasmagoria of shifting limbs and faces which moved through the evil-smelling twilight of this terrible prison-house. Callot might have drawn it, Dante might have suggested it, but a minute attempt to describe its horrors would but disgust.

Translations

Noun

disgust (uncountable)

  1. An intense dislike or loathing someone feels for something bad or nasty.
    With an air of disgust, she stormed out of the room.

Translations

Further reading

  • disgust in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • disgust in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • disgust at OneLook Dictionary Search

Catalan

Etymology

dis- +‎ gust

Noun

disgust m (plural disgusts or disgustos)

  1. displeasure
    Antonym: plaer

Derived terms

  • disgustar

Further reading

  • “disgust” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “disgust” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “disgust” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “disgust” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.


English

Etymology

Borrowed from French révolter, from Italian rivoltare, itself either from ri- with the verb voltare, or possibly from a Vulgar Latin *revoltāre < *revolvitāre, for *revolūtāre, frequentative of Latin revolvō (roll back) (through its past participle revolūtus).

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɹɪˈvoʊlt/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɹɪˈvəʊlt/
  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɹɪˈvɒlt/
  • Rhymes: -əʊlt
  • Hyphenation: re‧volt

Verb

revolt (third-person singular simple present revolts, present participle revolting, simple past and past participle revolted)

  1. To rebel, particularly against authority.
  2. To repel greatly.
    • This abominable medley is made rather to revolt young and ingenuous minds.
    • 1870, John Morley, Condorcet (published in the Fortnightly Review
      To derive delight from what inflicts pain on any sentient creature revolted his conscience and offended his reason.
  3. To cause to turn back; to roll or drive back; to put to flight.
  4. (intransitive) To be disgusted, shocked, or grossly offended; hence, to feel nausea; used with at.
  5. To turn away; to abandon or reject something; specifically, to turn away, or shrink, with abhorrence.
    • 1886, John Morley, The Life of Turgot
      His clear intelligence revolted from the dominant sophisms of that time.

Translations

Noun

revolt (countable and uncountable, plural revolts)

  1. An act of revolt.
    Synonyms: insurrection, rebellion

Translations

Related terms

  • revolting

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

Borrowed from French révolte.

Noun

rèvolt m (Cyrillic spelling рѐволт)

  1. revolt

Declension

This entry needs an inflection-table template.


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