dismay vs dispirit what difference

what is difference between dismay and dispirit

English

Etymology

From Middle English dismayen, from Anglo-Norman *desmaiier, alteration of Old French esmaier (to frighten), probably from Vulgar Latin *exmagare (to deprive (someone) of strength, to disable), from ex- + *magare (to enable, empower), from Proto-Germanic *maginą, *maganą (might, power), from Proto-Indo-European *megʰ- (to be able). Akin to Old High German magan, megin (power, might, main), Old English mæġen (might, main), Old High German magan, mugan (to be powerful, able), Old English magan (to be able). Cognate with Portuguese desmaiar (to faint). See also Portuguese esmagar, Spanish amagar. More at main, may.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɪsˈmeɪ/
  • Rhymes: -eɪ

Verb

dismay (third-person singular simple present dismays, present participle dismaying, simple past and past participle dismayed)

  1. To cause to feel apprehension; great sadness, or fear; to deprive of energy
    Synonyms: daunt, appall, terrify
    • 1611, King James Version, Josh. i. 9
      Be not afraid, neither be thou dismayed.
    • What words be these? What fears do you dismay?
  2. To render lifeless; to subdue; to disquiet.
  3. To take dismay or fright; to be filled with dismay.
    • 1592, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 1, III. iii. 1:
      Dismay not, princes, at this accident,
Translations

Noun

dismay (uncountable)

  1. A sudden or complete loss of courage and firmness in the face of trouble or danger; overwhelming and disabling terror; a sinking of the spirits
    Synonym: consternation
    • 1596-97, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act I Scene 3
      Come on: in this there can be no dismay;
      My ships come home a month before the day.
  2. Condition fitted to dismay; ruin.

Translations

Anagrams

  • yidams


English

Alternative forms

  • disspirit

Etymology

dis- +‎ spirit

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɪrɪt

Verb

dispirit (third-person singular simple present dispirits, present participle dispiriting, simple past and past participle dispirited)

  1. (transitive) To lower the morale of; to make despondent; to dishearten.

Derived terms

Translations


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