disorder vs trouble what difference

what is difference between disorder and trouble

English

Alternative forms

  • disordre (obsolete)

Etymology

From dis- +‎ order. Middle English disordeine, from Old French desordainer, from Medieval Latin disordinare.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /dɪsˈɔːdə(ɹ)/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /dɪsˈɔːɹdɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)də(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: dis‧or‧der

Noun

disorder (countable and uncountable, plural disorders)

  1. Absence of order; state of not being arranged in an orderly manner.
  2. A disturbance of civic peace or of public order.
  3. (medicine, countable) A physical or mental malfunction.

Synonyms

  • (absence of order): chaos, entropy; see also Thesaurus:disorder
  • (disturbance of civic peace): See also Thesaurus:riot

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

disorder (third-person singular simple present disorders, present participle disordering, simple past and past participle disordered)

  1. (transitive) To throw into a state of disorder.
  2. (transitive) To knock out of order or sequence.

Translations

Anagrams

  • disordre, sordider


English

Etymology

Verb is from Middle English troublen, trublen, turblen, troblen, borrowed from Old French troubler, trobler, trubler, metathetic variants of tourbler, torbler, turbler, from Vulgar Latin *turbulō, from Latin turbula (disorderly group, a little crowd or people), diminutive of turba (stir; crowd). The noun is from Middle English truble, troble, from Old French troble, from the verb.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: trŭbʹəl; IPA(key): /ˈtɹʌb(ə)l/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈtɹʌb(ə)l/, /ˈtɹə-/
  • Rhymes: -ʌbəl
  • Hyphenation: trou‧ble

Noun

trouble (countable and uncountable, plural troubles)

  1. A distressing or dangerous situation.
  2. A difficulty, problem, condition, or action contributing to such a situation.
  3. A violent occurrence or event.
  4. Efforts taken or expended, typically beyond the normal required.
    • 1850, William Cullen Bryant, Letters of a Traveller
      She never took the trouble to close them.
    • 1881, Robert Louis Stevenson, Virginibus Puerisque:
      Indeed, by the report of our elders, this nervous preparation for old age is only trouble thrown away.
  5. A malfunction.
  6. Liability to punishment; conflict with authority.
  7. (mining) A fault or interruption in a stratum.
  8. (Cockney rhyming slang) Wife. Clipping of trouble and strife.

Usage notes

  • Verbs often used with “trouble”: make, spell, stir up, ask for, etc.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:difficult situation

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Jersey Dutch: tröbel

Translations

See also

  • Appendix:Collocations of do, have, make, and take for uses and meaning of trouble collocated with these words.

Verb

trouble (third-person singular simple present troubles, present participle troubling, simple past and past participle troubled)

  1. (transitive, now rare) To disturb, stir up, agitate (a medium, especially water).
  2. (transitive) To mentally distress; to cause (someone) to be anxious or perplexed.
    What she said about narcissism is troubling me.
  3. (transitive) In weaker sense: to bother or inconvenience.
    I will not trouble you to deliver the letter.
  4. (reflexive or intransitive) To take pains to do something.
    I won’t trouble to post the letter today; I can do it tomorrow.
  5. (intransitive) To worry; to be anxious.
    • 1946, Bertrand Russell, History of Western Philosophy, I.26:
      Why trouble about the future? It is wholly uncertain.

Related terms

  • turbid
  • turbulent

Descendants

  • Jersey Dutch: tröble

Translations

Further reading

  • trouble in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • trouble in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • -buterol, Boulter, boulter

French

Etymology 1

Deverbal of troubler or from Old French troble.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tʁubl/

Noun

trouble m (plural troubles)

  1. trouble
  2. (medicine) disorder

Derived terms

  • fauteur de troubles
  • trouble bipolaire
  • trouble de l’humeur
  • trouble de la personnalité
  • trouble du sommeil
  • trouble obsessionnel compulsif

Verb

trouble

  1. first-person singular present indicative of troubler
  2. third-person singular present indicative of troubler
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of troubler
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of troubler
  5. second-person singular imperative of troubler

Etymology 2

From Old French troble, probably from a Vulgar Latin *turbulus (with metathesis), itself perhaps an alteration of Latin turbidus with influence from turbulentus; cf. also turbula. Compare Catalan tèrbol, Romanian tulbure.

Adjective

trouble (plural troubles)

  1. (of a liquid) murky, turbid, muddy, thick, clouded, cloudy; not clear

Derived terms

  • pêcher en eau trouble

Further reading

  • “trouble” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

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