disport vs lark what difference

what is difference between disport and lark

English

Etymology

The verb is derived from Middle English disporten, desporten (to take part in entertainment, sport, etc., to pass time, amuse oneself, be merry; to amuse, entertain; to cheer, console; to behave (in a particular way), deport; to be active, to busy; to relieve (someone of a task); to prevent (someone from attending)), from Anglo-Norman desporter, Old French desporter, deporter, depporter (to amuse, entertain; to pass time, amuse oneself; to forbear; to stop), from Latin deportāre, present active infinitive of dēportō (to bring, convey; to bring or take home; to carry along or down; to banish, transport), from dē- (prefix meaning ‘from, off’) + portō (to bear, carry; to bring, convey) (from Proto-Indo-European *per- (to carry forth; fare)). The English word is a doublet of deport. Also a doublet of sport

The noun is derived from Middle English disport, desport (activity providing amusement, pleasure or relaxation; entertainment, recreation; game, pastime, sport; pleasure derived from an activity; source of comfort; consolation, solace; conduct, deportment; customary behaviour, manner; act, activity; departure), from Anglo-Norman disport, Old French desport, deport (game, pastime, sport; pleasure, recreation; disport), from desporter: see further above.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /dɪˈspɔːt/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /dəˈspɔɹt/
  • Hyphenation: dis‧port

Verb

disport (third-person singular simple present disports, present participle disporting, simple past and past participle disported)

  1. (transitive, intransitive, reflexive, dated) To amuse oneself divertingly or playfully; in particular, to cavort or gambol.
    Synonyms: cheer, divert, enjoy, frolic

Conjugation

Translations

Noun

disport (plural disports)

  1. (countable, archaic) Anything which diverts one from serious matters; a game, a pastime, a sport.
  2. (uncountable, archaic) Amusement, entertainment, recreation, relaxation.
  3. (countable, obsolete) The way one carries oneself; bearing, carriage, deportment.
  4. (countable, obsolete) Bearing, elevation, orientation.
    • 1662, Thomas Salusbury, Galileo’s Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief Systems of the World (Dialogue Two)
      … shooting a bullet … out of a Culverin towards the East, and afterwards another, with the same charge, and at the same elevation or disport towards the West.
  5. (uncountable, obsolete) Fun, gaiety, joy, merriment, mirth.

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • torpids, tripods


English

Alternative forms

  • laverock, lavrock

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: läk, IPA(key): /lɑːk/
  • (General American) enPR: lärk, IPA(key): /lɑɹk/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)k

Etymology 1

From Middle English larke, laverke, from Old English lāwerce, lǣwerce, lāuricæ, from Proto-Germanic *laiwarikǭ, *laiwazikǭ (compare dialectal West Frisian larts, Dutch leeuwerik, German Lerche), from *laiwaz (borrowed into Finnish leivo, Estonian lõo), of unknown ultimate origin with no definitive cognates outside of Germanic.

Noun

lark (plural larks)

  1. Any of various small, singing passerine birds of the family Alaudidae.
  2. Any of various similar-appearing birds, but usually ground-living, such as the meadowlark and titlark.
  3. (by extension) One who wakes early; one who is up with the larks.
    Synonyms: early bird, early riser
    Antonym: owl
Hyponyms
  • (species in Alaudidae): woodlark, skylark, magpie-lark, horned lark, sea lark, crested lark, shorelark
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

lark (third-person singular simple present larks, present participle larking, simple past and past participle larked)

  1. To catch larks (type of bird).

References

  • lark on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Alaudidae on Wikimedia Commons.Wikimedia Commons
  • Alaudidae on Wikispecies.Wikispecies

Etymology 2

Origin uncertain, either

  • from a northern English dialectal term lake/laik (to play) (around 1300, from Old Norse leika (to play (as opposed to work))), with an intrusive -r- as is common in southern British dialects; or
  • a shortening of skylark (1809), sailors’ slang, “play roughly in the rigging of a ship”, because the common European larks were proverbial for high-flying; Dutch has a similar idea in speelvogel (playbird, a person of markedly playful nature).

Noun

lark (plural larks)

  1. A romp, frolic, some fun.
  2. A prank.
Synonyms
  • whim, especially in phrase on a whim, see also Thesaurus:whim
Derived terms
  • on a lark
Related terms
  • skylark (in verb sense “play”)
Translations

Verb

lark (third-person singular simple present larks, present participle larking, simple past and past participle larked)

  1. To sport, engage in harmless pranking.
    • 1855, Elizabeth Gaskell, North and South, Chapter 35,[3]
      [] the porter at the rail-road had seen a scuffle; or when he found it was likely to bring him in as a witness, then it might not have been a scuffle, only a little larking []
  2. To frolic, engage in carefree adventure.
Derived terms
  • lark about
  • lark around
Translations

References

  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “lark”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.
  • Webster’s Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, G.&C. Merriam Co., 1967

Anagrams

  • Karl, Klar, Kral, klar

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