dispose vs incline what difference

what is difference between dispose and incline

English

Etymology

From French disposer.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /dɪsˈpoʊz/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /dɪˈspəʊz/
  • Rhymes: -əʊz

Verb

dispose (third-person singular simple present disposes, present participle disposing, simple past and past participle disposed)

  1. (intransitive, used with “of”) To eliminate or to get rid of something.
  2. To distribute or arrange; to put in place.
    • 1600, William Shakespeare, Henry V, act 4, scene III
      Now, dear soldiers, march away: / And how thou pleasest, God, dispose the day!
    • 1811, Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility, chapter 6
      Marianne’s pianoforte was unpacked and properly disposed of, and Elinor’s drawing were affixed to the walls of their sitting rooms.
    • 1934, Rex Stout, Fer-de-Lance, 1992 Bantam edition, →ISBN, page 47:
      I sat down within three feet of the entrance door, and I had no sooner got disposed than the door opened and a man came in [] .
  3. To deal out; to assign to a use.
    • 1818 (first published), John Evelyn, diary entry for 1634
      what he designed to bestow on her funeral, he would rather dispose among the poor
  4. To incline.
    (Used here intransitively in the passive voice)
    • Endure and conquer; Jove will soon dispose / To future good our past and present woes.
    • 1625, Francis Bacon, Of Suspicion
      They [suspicions] dispose kings to tyranny, husbands to jealousy, and wise men to irresolution and melancholy.
    • At twilight in the summer [] the mice come out. They [] eat the luncheon crumbs. Mr. Checkly, for instance, always brought his dinner in a paper parcel in his coat-tail pocket, and ate it when so disposed, sprinkling crumbs lavishly [] on the floor.
  5. (obsolete) To bargain; to make terms.
  6. (obsolete) To regulate; to adjust; to settle; to determine.
    • the knightly forms of combat to dispose

Synonyms

  • incline
  • discard

Antonyms

  • indispose
  • disincline

Derived terms

  • disposition
  • disposal
  • dispose of

Translations

Noun

dispose

  1. (obsolete) The disposal or management of something.
  2. (obsolete) Behaviour; disposition.

French

Pronunciation

Verb

dispose

  1. first-person singular present indicative of disposer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of disposer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of disposer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of disposer
  5. second-person singular imperative of disposer

Italian

Verb

dispose

  1. third-person singular past historic of disporre

Anagrams

  • dispeso


English

Alternative forms

  • encline (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English enclinen, from Old French encliner (modern incliner), from Latin inclīnō (incline, tilt), from in- + clīnō (compare -cline), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱley- (English lean).

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -aɪn
  • (verb) enPR: ĭnklīn’, IPA(key): /ɪnˈklaɪn/
  • (noun) enPR: ĭn’klīn, IPA(key): /ˈɪn.klaɪn/

Verb

incline (third-person singular simple present inclines, present participle inclining, simple past and past participle inclined)

  1. (transitive) To bend or move (something) out of a given plane or direction, often the horizontal or vertical.
  2. (intransitive) To slope.
  3. (chiefly intransitive, chiefly passive) To tend to do or believe something, or move or be moved in a certain direction, away from a point of view, attitude, etc.
    • “My tastes,” he said, still smiling, “incline me to the garishly sunlit side of this planet.” And, to tease her and arouse her to combat: “I prefer a farandole to a nocturne; I’d rather have a painting than an etching; Mr. Whistler bores me with his monochromatic mud; I don’t like dull colours, dull sounds, dull intellects; [].”
    • 1966, J. M. G. van der Poel, “Agriculture in Pre- and Protohistoric Times”, in the Acta Historiae Neerlandica published by the Netherlands Committee of Historical Sciences, p.170:
      The terp farmer made use of the plough, as is shown by the discovery of three ploughshares and four coulters. [] Those who inclined to the stock-breeding theory based their arguments on the absence of ploughs, [].

Related terms

  • inclination

Translations

Noun

incline (plural inclines)

  1. A slope.
    To reach the building, we had to climb a steep incline.

Related terms

  • climate
  • cline
  • decline
  • recline

Translations

Further reading

  • incline in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • incline in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • incline at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • -nicline

French

Pronunciation

Verb

incline

  1. first-person singular present indicative of incliner
  2. third-person singular present indicative of incliner
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of incliner
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of incliner
  5. second-person singular imperative of incliner

Galician

Verb

incline

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of inclinar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of inclinar

Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /inˈkli.ne/

Adjective

incline (plural inclini)

  1. inclined, prone
    Synonyms: facile, propenso

Portuguese

Verb

incline

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of inclinar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of inclinar
  3. third-person singular imperative of inclinar

Spanish

Verb

incline

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of inclinar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of inclinar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of inclinar.

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