diss vs insult what difference

what is difference between diss and insult

English

Alternative forms

  • dis

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɪs/
  • Rhymes: -ɪs

Etymology 1

Originated in Jamaican English or African American Vernacular English, probably originally a clipping of disrespect or disparage.

Verb

diss (third-person singular simple present disses, present participle dissing, simple past and past participle dissed)

  1. (Canada, US, Britain, slang) To put (someone) down, or show disrespect by the use of insulting language or dismissive behaviour.
    • 1905, 10 December, The Sunday Times (Perth), “A New Word”, page 4:
      When a journalistic rival tries to “dis” you
      And to prejudice you in the public’s eyes.
      Don’t stigmatise his charges as a “tissue
      Of palpable, unmitigated lies.”
Translations

Noun

diss (plural disses)

  1. (slang) An insult or put-down; an expression of disrespect.

Synonyms

  • (Britain, slang) send
Translations
Related terms
  • diss song, diss track

Etymology 2

Clipping of dissertation

Noun

diss (plural disses)

  1. (slang) Dissertation.

Etymology 3

From Arabic دِيس(dīs).

Noun

diss (uncountable)

  1. Ampelodesmos mauritanicus syn. Ampelodesmos tenax, a reedy grass used for cordage.

Anagrams

  • ISDs, SDIs, SIDS, SIDs, SISD, SSID

Chinese

Etymology

Borrowed from English diss.

Verb

diss

  1. (slang) to diss (to put (someone) down, or show disrespect by the use of insulting language or dismissive behaviour)

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English diss.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɪs/
  • Hyphenation: dis
  • Rhymes: -ɪs
  • Homophone: dis

Noun

diss m (plural disses or dissen)

  1. (slang, hiphop) A diss.

Related terms

  • dissen

Swedish

Noun

diss c

  1. (slang) diss, rejection

Declension


Westrobothnian

Etymology 1

From Old Norse þess, gen. of þat n, from Proto-Germanic *þat (neuter of *sa (that)), from Proto-Indo-European *tód (neuter of *só (that)). Compare di.

Adverb

diss

  1. The…the (when comparing)

Etymology 2

Verb

diss

  1. singular imperative of diis


English

Etymology

The verb is derived from Middle French insulter (modern French insulter (to insult)) or its etymon Latin īnsultāre, present active infinitive of īnsultō (to spring, leap or jump at or upon; to abuse, insult, revile, taunt), the frequentative form of īnsiliō (to bound; to leap in or upon), from in- (prefix meaning ‘in, inside, within’) + saliō (to bound, jump, leap; to spring forth; to flow down) (ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *sel- (to spring)).

The noun is derived from Middle French insult (modern French insulte (insult)) or its etymon Late Latin insultus (insult, reviling, scoffing), from īnsiliō (to bound; to leap in or upon); see above.

Pronunciation

  • Verb:
    • (Received Pronunciation, General American) enPR: ĭnsŭltʹ, IPA(key): /ɪnˈsʌlt/
  • Noun:
    • enPR: ĭnʹsŭlt, IPA(key): /ˈɪnsʌlt/
  • Rhymes: -ʌlt
  • Hyphenation: in‧sult

Verb

insult (third-person singular simple present insults, present participle insulting, simple past and past participle insulted)

  1. (transitive) To be insensitive, insolent, or rude to (somebody); to affront or demean (someone). [from 17th c.]
    Synonyms: disrespect, affront, disgrace, slander, discourtesy, offense
    Antonym: compliment
  2. (transitive, also figuratively, obsolete) To assail, assault, or attack; (specifically, military) to carry out an assault, attack, or onset without preparation.
  3. (intransitive, obsolete) To behave in an obnoxious and superior manner (against or over someone). [16th–19th c.]
  4. (intransitive, obsolete, rare) To leap or trample upon.

Conjugation

Related terms

  • insolence
  • insultation

Translations

Noun

insult (countable and uncountable, plural insults)

  1. (uncountable) Action or form of speech deliberately intended to be rude; (countable) a particular act or statement having this effect.
    Synonyms: affront, (slang) diss, (obsolete) insultation, (Britain) offence, (US) offense, pejorative, (US, colloquial) slam, slight, slur; see also Thesaurus:offense
    Antonym: compliment
  2. (countable) Something that causes offence (for example, by being of an unacceptable quality).
    Synonyms: disgrace, outrage
  3. (countable, uncountable, medicine) Something causing disease or injury to the body or bodily processes; the injury so caused.
  4. (countable, also figuratively, archaic) An assault or attack; (specifically, military, obsolete) an assault, attack, or onset carried out without preparation.
  5. (countable, obsolete) An act of leaping upon.

Derived terms

  • add insult to injury

Translations

References

Further reading

  • insult on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • insult (medical) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • insult (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • sunlit, unlist, unslit

Catalan

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /inˈsul(t)/

Noun

insult m (plural insults)

  1. insult

Related terms

  • insultar

Further reading

  • “insult” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [inˈsult]

Verb

insult

  1. first-person singular present indicative/subjunctive of insulta

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