dissemble vs sham what difference

what is difference between dissemble and sham

English

Etymology

From Latin dissimulare.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [dɪˈsɛmbəɫ]

Verb

dissemble (third-person singular simple present dissembles, present participle dissembling, simple past and past participle dissembled)

  1. (transitive) To disguise or conceal something.
    • 1788, John Philip Kemble, The Panel
      Perhaps it was right to dissemble your love.
  2. (transitive) To feign.
    • 1681, John Dryden, Absalom and Achitophel
      And like a lion, slumb’ring in the way,
      Or sleep-dissembling, while he waits his prey.
    • May 16, 1710, Isaac Bickerstaff (pseudonym for Richard Steele or (in some later numbers of the journal) Joseph Addison), The Tatler No. 172
      He soon dissembled a sleep.
  3. (transitive) To deliberately ignore something; to pretend not to notice.
  4. (intransitive) To falsely hide one’s opinions or feelings.
    • XVII century, John Dryden, Cymon And Iphigenia; from Boccace
      While to his arms the blushing bride he took,
      To seeming sadness she composed her look;
      As if by force subjected to his will,
      Though pleased, dissembling, and a woman still.

Usage notes

Not to be confused with disassemble (take apart).

Synonyms

  • (to pretend not to notice): disregard, take no notice of; see also Thesaurus:ignore

Translations



English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʃæm/
  • Rhymes: -æm

Etymology 1

Probably a dialectal form of shame.

Adjective

sham

  1. Intended to deceive; false.
  2. counterfeit; unreal
    • 1881, Benjamin Jowett, Thucydides
      They scorned the sham independence proffered to them by the Athenians.
Synonyms
  • mock
  • See also Thesaurus:fake
Antonyms
  • genuine
  • sincere
  • real
Derived terms
  • shammish
Translations

Noun

sham (countable and uncountable, plural shams)

  1. A fake; an imitation that purports to be genuine.
  2. Trickery, hoaxing.
  3. A false front, or removable ornamental covering.
  4. A decorative cover for a pillow.
Derived terms
  • shamateur
Translations
See also
  • pillow sham

Verb

sham (third-person singular simple present shams, present participle shamming, simple past and past participle shammed)

  1. To deceive, cheat, lie.
  2. To obtrude by fraud or imposition.
  3. To assume the manner and character of; to imitate; to ape; to feign.
Translations

Etymology 2

Noun

sham (uncountable)

  1. (slang) Champagne.
    • 1840, William Makepeace Thackeray, The Paris Sketchbook
      So I orders a bottle, as if for myself; and, ‘Ma’am,’ says I, ‘will you take a glass of Sham — just one?’

Further reading

  • sham in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • sham in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • sham at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • AMHS, HMAS, HSAM, Hams, MASH, MHAs, MSHA, Mahs, Mash, SAHM, Sahm, hams, mash

Karakalpak

Etymology

From Arabic شمع

Noun

sham

  1. candle

Uzbek

Etymology

From Arabic شمع

Noun

sham (plural shamlar)

  1. candle

Declension


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