dither vs flap what difference

what is difference between dither and flap

English

Etymology

Variant of didder, from Middle English didderen (to tremble), ultimately from Proto-Germanic *titrōną, whence also derived Old High German zittarōn (German zittern) and Old Norse titra (Faroese titra, Icelandic titra).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈdɪðə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈdɪðɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪðə(ɹ)

Verb

dither (third-person singular simple present dithers, present participle dithering, simple past and past participle dithered) (intransitive)

  1. To tremble, shake, or shiver with cold.
    • 1913, D.H. Lawrence, Sons and Lovers, chapter 8
      Presently he came running out of the scullery, with the soapy water dripping from him, dithering with cold.
  2. To be uncertain or unable to make a decision about doing something.
    • 2012, The Economist, Sept. 22nd issue, Indian Reform: At Last
      The dithering Mr Singh of recent times may worry that his reform proposals are already too bold. The reforming Mr Singh of yore would see them as just the start.
  3. To do something nervously.
  4. (computer graphics) To render an approximation of (an image, etc.) by using dot patterns to approximate (the features of) colors not in the system palette.
  5. To intentionally add noise to a signal to randomize errors.

Derived terms

  • ditherer
  • dithering
  • ditheringly
  • dithery

Related terms

  • dodder

Translations

Noun

dither (countable and uncountable, plural dithers)

  1. The state of being undecided.
  1. A form of noise which is intentionally applied to randomize errors which occur in the processing of both digital audio and digital video data.
  2. (computer graphics) The use of dot patterns to approximate colors not available in the palette.

Derived terms

  • in a dither

Translations

Further reading

  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “dither”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • drieth, rideth, thirde


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /flæp/
  • Rhymes: -æp

Etymology 1

From Middle English flap, flappe (a slap; blow; buffet; fly-flap; something flexible or loose; flap), related to Middle Dutch flabbe (a blow; slap on the face; fly-flap; flap) (modern Dutch flap (flap)), Middle Low German flabbe, vlabbe, flebbe, from the verb (see below). Related also to English flab and flabby.

Noun

flap (plural flaps)

  1. Anything broad and flexible that hangs loose, or that is attached by one side or end and is easily moved.
  2. A hinged leaf.
  3. (aviation) A hinged surface on the trailing edge of the wings of an aeroplane.
  4. A side fin of a ray.
    Synonym: wing
  5. The motion of anything broad and loose, or a sound or stroke made with it.
  6. A controversy, scandal, stir, or upset.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:commotion
  7. (phonetics) A consonant sound made by a single muscle contraction, such as the sound [[ɾ]] in the standard American English pronunciation of body.
    Synonym: tap
  8. (surgery) A piece of tissue incompletely detached from the body, as an intermediate stage of plastic surgery.
  9. (veterinary medicine) A disease in the lips of horses.
  10. (slang, vulgar, chiefly in the plural) The labia, the vulva.
  11. (obsolete) A blow or slap (especially to the face).
    • 1450, Palladius on Husbondrieː
      Ware the horn and heels lest they fling a flap to thee.
    • a1500 The Prose Merlinː
      The squire lift up his hand and gave him such a flap that all they in the chapel might it hear.
  12. (obsolete) A young prostitute.
    • 1631, James Mabbe, Celestina IX. 110
      Fall to your flap, my Masters, kisse and clip. [] Come hither, you foule flappes.
Derived terms
  • cat flap
  • (aeroplane): flaperon
  • flap seat
Translations
See also
  • flap on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • fold
  • lappet

Etymology 2

From Middle English flappen (to flap, clap, slap, strike), related to Dutch flappen (to flap), German Low German flappen (to flap), German flappen (to flap), Dutch flabberen (to flit, flap). Probably ultimately imitative.

Verb

flap (third-person singular simple present flaps, present participle flapping, simple past and past participle flapped)

  1. (transitive) To move (something broad and loose) up and down.
    The crow slowly flapped its wings.
  2. (intransitive) To move loosely back and forth.
    The flag flapped in the breeze.
  3. (computing, telecommunications, intransitive) Of a resource or network destination: to be advertised as being available and then unavailable (or available by different routes) in rapid succession.
Translations

Derived terms

  • aflap
  • flapper
  • flappingly
  • unflappable

Anagrams

  • PLAF

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch flabbe, probably ultimately imitative.

Pronunciation

Noun

flap m (plural flappen, diminutive flapje n)

  1. flap (something flexible that is loose)
  2. (colloquial) banknote

Derived terms

  • appelflap
  • flappentap
  • flappen tappen

Volapük

Noun

flap (nominative plural flaps)

  1. blow, hit

Declension

Derived terms

  • flapan
  • flapön

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