dodger vs fox what difference

what is difference between dodger and fox

English

Etymology

dodge +‎ -er.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdɒdʒə(ɹ)/
  • Rhymes: -ɒdʒə(ɹ)

Noun

dodger (countable and uncountable, plural dodgers)

  1. (countable) Someone who dodges (avoids something by quickly moving).
  2. (countable) A person full of tricks or street smarts.
  3. (countable, nautical) A frame-supported canvas over the companionway (entrance) of a sailboat providing the on-deck crew partial cover from the splashes of the seas that break against the hull of the boat.
  4. (countable, Australia, slang) An advertising leaflet; a flyer.
  5. (uncountable, Australia, US, slang, dated) Bread.

Synonyms

  • (companionway cover): sprayhood

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • red dog


English

Etymology

From Middle English fox, from Old English fox (fox), from Proto-West Germanic *fuhs, from Proto-Germanic *fuhsaz (fox), from Proto-Indo-European *púḱsos (the tailed one), possibly from *puḱ- (tail).

Cognate with Scots fox (fox), West Frisian foks (fox), Fering-Öömrang North Frisian foos and Sölring and Heligoland fos, Dutch vos (fox), Low German vos (fox), German Fuchs (fox), Icelandic fóa (fox), Tocharian B päkā (tail, chowrie), Russian пух (pux, down, fluff), Sanskrit पुच्छ (púccha) (whence Torwali پوش(pūš, fox), Hindi पूंछ (pūñch, tail)).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /fɒks/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /fɑks/
  • Rhymes: -ɒks

Noun

fox (plural foxes or (nonstandard, dialectal) foxen)

  1. A red fox, small carnivore (Vulpes vulpes), related to dogs and wolves, with red or silver fur and a bushy tail.
    • 15th century, The Fox, verse 1:
      The fox went out on a chase one night, / he prayed to the Moon to give him light, / for he had many a mile to go that night / before he reached the town-o, town-o, town-o. / He had many a mile to go that night / before he reached the town-o.
  2. Any of numerous species of small wild canids resembling the red fox. In the taxonomy they form the tribe Vulpini within the family Canidae, consisting of nine genera (see the Wikipedia article on the fox).
  3. The fur of a fox.
  4. A fox terrier.
  5. The gemmeous dragonet, a fish, Callionymus lyra, so called from its yellow color.
  6. A cunning person.
  7. (slang, figuratively) A physically attractive man or woman.
    • 1993, Laura Antoniou, The Marketplace, p.90:
      And Jerry was cute, you know, I liked him, but Frank was a total fox. And he was rougher than Jerry, you know, not so cultured.
  8. (nautical) A small strand of rope made by twisting several rope-yarns together. Used for seizings, mats, sennits, and gaskets.
  9. (mechanics) A wedge driven into the split end of a bolt to tighten it.
  10. A hidden radio transmitter, finding which is the goal of radiosport.
    • 2006, H. Ward Silver, The ARRL Ham Radio License Manual
      Locating a hidden transmitter (the fox) has been a popular ham activity for many years.
  11. (cartomancy) The fourteenth Lenormand card.
  12. (obsolete) A sword; so called from the stamp of a fox on the blade, or perhaps of a wolf taken for a fox.

Synonyms

  • (a mammal related to dogs and wolves): tod
  • (attractive man or woman): see also Thesaurus:beautiful woman

Hypernyms

  • canid

Hyponyms

  • vixen (feminine form)

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Cheyenne: vóhkéso
  • Japanese: フォックス (fokkusu)
  • Maori: pōkiha

Translations

See also

  • (canids) canid; coyote, dog, fox, jackal, wolf (Category: en:Canids)
  • Reynard
  • kitsune
  • cub

References

  • Fox in the 1921 edition of Collier’s Encyclopedia.

Verb

fox (third-person singular simple present foxes, present participle foxing, simple past and past participle foxed)

  1. (transitive) To trick, fool or outwit (someone) by cunning or ingenuity.
  2. (transitive) To confuse or baffle (someone).
    This crossword puzzle has completely foxed me.
  3. (intransitive) To act slyly or craftily.
  4. (intransitive) To discolour paper. Fox marks are spots on paper caused by humidity. (See foxing.)
    The pages of the book show distinct foxing.
  5. (transitive) To make sour, as beer, by causing it to ferment.
  6. (intransitive) To turn sour; said of beer, etc., when it sours in fermenting.
  7. (transitive) To intoxicate; to stupefy with drink.
    • I drank [] so much wine that I was almost foxed.
  8. (transitive) To repair (boots) with new front upper leather, or to piece the upper fronts of.

Derived terms

  • outfox

Translations

Anagrams

  • Oxf.

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • vox, wox

Etymology

From Old English fox, from Proto-West Germanic *fuhs, from Proto-Germanic *fuhsaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɔks/
  • Rhymes: -ɔks

Noun

fox (plural foxes or fox)

  1. A fox or its fur.
  2. A lier or schemer.

Descendants

  • English: fox
  • Scots: fox
  • Yola: voxe

References

  • “fox, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *fuhs, from Proto-Germanic *fuhsaz. Cognate with Old Frisian *foks, Old Saxon fohs, Old Dutch fus, Old High German fuhs.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /foks/

Noun

fox m (nominative plural foxas)

  1. fox

Declension

Derived terms

  • foxhol

Descendants

  • Middle English: fox, vox, wox
    • English: fox
    • Scots: fox
    • Yola: voxe

Old French

Alternative forms

  • fols, fous

Adjective

fox

  1. nominative and oblique masculine singular of fol

Romanian

Etymology

From French fox.

Noun

fox m (plural focși)

  1. fox terrier

Declension


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