doldrums vs stagnancy what difference

what is difference between doldrums and stagnancy

English

Etymology

From obsolete doldrum (slothful or stupid person) plus the plural suffix -s. Doldrum is possibly derived from dull or Middle English dold (past participle of dullen, dollen (to make or become blunt or dull; to make or become dull-witted or stupid; to make or become inactive), from dul, dol, dolle (not sharp, blunt, dull; not quick-witted, stupid; lethargic, sluggish); see further at dull), modelled after tantrum.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈdɒldɹəmz/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈdɑldɹəmz/
  • Hyphenation: dol‧drums

Noun

doldrums pl (plural only)

  1. Usually preceded by the: a state of apathy or lack of interest; a situation where one feels boredom, ennui, or tedium; a state of listlessness or malaise.
    Synonym: dumps
  2. (nautical) Usually preceded by the: the state of a sailing ship when it is impeded by calms or light, baffling winds, and is unable to make progress.
  3. (nautical, oceanography, by extension) Usually preceded by the: a part of the ocean near the equator where calms, squalls, and light, baffling winds are common.
    Synonyms: calms, intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ)

Related terms

  • doldrum

Translations

See also

  • intertropical front (ITF)

Noun

doldrums

  1. (obsolete) plural of doldrum (slothful or stupid person)

References

Further reading

  • Intertropical Convergence Zone on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • doldrums (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia


English

Etymology

stagnant +‎ -cy

Noun

stagnancy (countable and uncountable, plural stagnancies)

  1. The property of being stagnant.

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