dolt vs stupid what difference

what is difference between dolt and stupid

English

Etymology

First used as a noun in Early Modern English, from dialectal English dold (stupid, confused), from Middle English dold, a variant of dulled, dult (dulled), past participle of dullen, dollen (to make dull, make stupid), from dull, dul, dwal (stupid). More at dull.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /dɒlt/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /dəʊlt/, /dɔʊlt/
  • (US) IPA(key): /doʊlt/
  • Rhymes: -əʊlt

Noun

dolt (plural dolts)

  1. (derogatory) A stupid person; a blockhead or dullard.
    • c. 1603, William Shakespeare, The Tragedy of Othello, The Moor of Venice
      O gull! O dolt! As ignorant as dirt!
    • 1627, Michael Drayton, Nimphidia, the Court of Faery
      This Puck seemes but a dreaming dolt.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:fool

Derived terms

  • doltery
  • doltish

Translations

Verb

dolt (third-person singular simple present dolts, present participle dolting, simple past and past participle dolted)

  1. (obsolete) To behave foolishly.

Anagrams

  • told

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɔlt/
  • Rhymes: -ɔlt

Verb

dolt

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of dollen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of dollen

Manx

Verb

dolt (verbal noun doltey, past participle doltit)

  1. to adopt, foster, initiate

Synonyms

  • (to foster): doltaghey

Swedish

Adjective

dolt

  1. absolute indefinite neuter singular of dold.

Verb

dolt

  1. supine of dölja.


English

Etymology

From Middle French stupide, from Latin stupidus (struck senseless, amazed), from stupeō (be amazed or confounded, be struck senseless), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)tup-, *(s)tewp- (to wonder), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)tew- (to stand, stay). Cognate with Old High German stubarōn (to be astonished, be stunned, be blocked). Related also to Old English stoppian (to block, stop). See stop.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈstjuːpɪd/
  • (Northern UK) IPA(key): /ˈʃtjuːpɪd/, /st͡ʃjuːpɪd/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈst(j)upɪd/
  • (General Australian) IPA(key): /ˈʃt͡ʃjʉːpəd/

Adjective

stupid (comparative stupider or more stupid, superlative stupidest or most stupid)

  1. Lacking in intelligence or exhibiting the quality of having been done by someone lacking in intelligence.
    Because it’s a big stupid jellyfish!
  2. To the point of stupor.
    Neurobiology bores me stupid.
  3. (archaic) Characterized by or in a state of stupor; paralysed.
    • 1702 Alexander Pope, Sappho 128:
      No sigh to rise, no tear had pow’r to flow, Fix’d in a stupid lethargy of woe.
  4. (archaic) Lacking sensation; inanimate; destitute of consciousness; insensate.
    • 1744 George Berkeley, Siris §190:
      Were it not for [fire], the whole wou’d be one great stupid inanimate mass.
  5. Dulled in feeling or sensation; torpid
  6. (slang) Amazing.
    That dunk was stupid! His head was above the rim!
  7. (slang) Darn, annoying.
    I fell over the stupid wire.
    • 2018, “The Secret(s) of Castle McDuck!” DuckTales:
      Duey: “It’s too narrow for all three of us. Oh, bummer!”
      Huey “Or we could just go single file.”
      Duey “Stupid smart Huey…”

Derived terms

Related terms

Synonyms

  • daft
  • inept

Translations

References

  • John A. Simpson and Edward S. C. Weiner, editors (1989), “stupid”, in The Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition, Oxford: Clarendon Press, →ISBN.

Adverb

stupid (comparative more stupid, superlative most stupid)

  1. (slang) Extremely.
    My gear is stupid fly.
    • 2011 Allen Gregory, “Pilot” (season 1, episode 1):
      Richard DeLongpre: Aw, we did, didn’t we? I’m sorry. I’m so stupid in love with you.

Translations

Noun

stupid (countable and uncountable, plural stupids)

  1. A stupid person; a fool.
    • 1922, Elizabeth G. Young, Homestead ranch
      “What a stupid I am!” Harry exclaimed, as she watched the man ride away in the distance.
  2. (colloquial, uncountable) The condition or state of being stupid; stupidity, stupidness.

Translations


Danish

Etymology

From Latin stupidus (senseless).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stupiːd/, [sd̥uˈpʰiðˀ]
  • Rhymes: -id

Adjective

stupid

  1. oafish
  2. stupid (lacking in intelligence)

Inflection

Related terms

  • stupiditet

Romanian

Etymology

French stupide, Latin stupidus

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [stuˈpid]

Adjective

stupid m or n (feminine singular stupidă, masculine plural stupizi, feminine and neuter plural stupide)

  1. stupid
    Synonyms: idiot, prost, tâmpit

Declension

Adverb

stupid

  1. stupidly

Related terms

  • stupiditate

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