dominate vs predominate what difference

what is difference between dominate and predominate

English

Etymology

From Latin dominātus, perfect active participle of dominor (rule, have dominion), from dominus (lord, master); see dominus.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈdɒməˌneɪt/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈdɑːməˌneɪt/

Verb

dominate (third-person singular simple present dominates, present participle dominating, simple past and past participle dominated)

  1. To govern, rule or control by superior authority or power
    Antonyms: obey, submit
  2. To exert an overwhelming guiding influence over something or someone
    Antonyms: obey, submit
  3. To enjoy a commanding position in some field
  4. To overlook from a height.
  5. (computing, graph theory) To precede another node of a directed graph in all paths from the start of the graph to the other node.

Derived terms

  • male-dominated

Related terms

Translations

Adjective

dominate (comparative more dominate, superlative most dominate)

  1. Eggcorn of dominant.

Noun

dominate (countable and uncountable, plural dominates)

  1. (historical) The late period of the Roman Empire, following the principate, during which the emperor’s rule became more explicitly autocratic and remaining vestiges of the Roman Republic were removed from the formal workings of government; the reign of any particular emperor during this period.
    • 1973, Karl Loewenstein, The Governance of Rome, Martinus Nijhoff, page 238,
      During the Dominate this tendency was perfected to the point of dirigism in the modern sense, a state-directed society and state-controlled economy, obliterating, once again a prelude to modern times, the laissez-faire climate that had characterized the economic self-determination of the individual under the republic and the Principate.
    • 1996, Clare Krojzl (translator), Sebastian Hensel, III: From Diocletian to Alaric [1886, lecture notes], Theodor Mommsen (editor), A History of Rome Under the Emperors, C.H.Beck’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, Republished 2005, Taylor & Francis (Routledge), eBook, page 317,
      The dominate of Diocletian and Constantine differs more sharply from the principate than the latter does from the Republic.
    • 1997, Thomas Dunlap (translator), Herwig Wolfram, The Roman Empire and Its Germanic Peoples, [1990, Das Reich und die Germanen], University of California Press, 2005, Paperback, page 55,
      Once someone had attained senatorial dignity by way of the successful tenure of some appropriate magistracy, one of the most important mechanisms of the dominate kicked in: all social rankings and professions were to a large extent heritable.

Usage notes

  • The period begins 284 CE — the end of the Crisis of the Third Century and beginning of the reign of Diocletian, who instituted reforms.
    • In the west, it ends 476 CE, with the collapse of the Western Roman Empire.
    • In the east, the end is taken either to be 565 CE (the end of Justinian I’s reign) or 641 CE (the end of Heraclius’ reign).

Coordinate terms

  • principate

Translations

See also

  • tetrarchy

Further reading

  • dominate in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • dominate in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • antimode, diamonte, nematoid, ominated

Esperanto

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /domiˈnate/

Adverb

dominate

  1. present adverbial passive participle of domini

Italian

Verb

dominate

  1. inflection of dominare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative

Participle

dominate

  1. feminine plural of the past participle of dominare

Anagrams

  • dimenato, indomate, meditano, menadito, metadoni, mondiate, nematodi, tendiamo

Latin

Participle

domināte

  1. vocative masculine singular of dominātus


English

Alternative forms

  • prædominate (obsolete)

Verb

predominate (third-person singular simple present predominates, present participle predominating, simple past and past participle predominated)

  1. (intransitive) To dominate, have control, or succeed by superior numbers or size.
  2. (intransitive) To be prominent; to loom large; to be the chief component of a whole.
  3. (transitive) To dominate or hold power over, especially through numerical advantage; to outweigh.

Synonyms

  • preponderate
  • prevail

Translations

Adjective

predominate

  1. Predominant.

Usage notes

  • Predominate is and has been much less common than predominant as an adjective.
  • Some usage and style authorities frown on predominate as an adjective. For example, Garner’s Modern American Usage calls it a “needless variant” and discourages its use on the grounds that it might cause a reader to interpret it as the verb, which has the same spelling.

Translations

Anagrams

  • pentameroid

Italian

Verb

predominate

  1. inflection of predominare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative
  2. feminine plural of predominato

Anagrams

  • pena di morte, perdonatemi, premeditano, pretendiamo

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