dominee vs dominus what difference

what is difference between dominee and dominus

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Dutch dominee and Afrikaans dominee.

Noun

dominee (plural dominees)

  1. (South Africa) A minister of the Dutch Reformed Church; a predikant.
    • 1978, André Brink, Rumours of Rain, Vintage 2000, p. 51:
      But Elise goes regularly, often twice on a Sunday, mainly as a result of the conditioning of her childhood as a dominee’s daughter, but also because she regards it as a good example to the children, especially Ilse.
  2. (US, dated) A minister in a Dutch Reformed church; a dominie.

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch dominee.

Noun

dominee (plural dominees)

  1. pastor; minister

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin domine, vocative of dominus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdoːmineː/, (Northern Dutch) [ˈdoʊ̯mineɪ̯], (Southern Dutch) [ˈdoːmineː]
  • Hyphenation: do‧mi‧nee

Noun

dominee m (plural dominees, diminutive domineetje n)

  1. (religion) minister, pastor in several Protestant denominations

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: dominee
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: domni
  • Negerhollands: domine, domni
  • Skepi Creole Dutch: domine, domni
  • English: dominee
  • Indonesian: domine
  • Papiamentu: domi
  • Sranan Tongo: domri

Abbreviations

  • ds., da.


English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin dominus (master). Doublet of dom, domine, dominie, and don.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdɒmɪnəs/

Noun

dominus (plural domini)

  1. master; sir; a title of respect formerly applied to a knight or clergyman, and sometimes to the lord of a manor or an academic master
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Cowell to this entry?)
    • The New Sporting Magazine (volume 15, page 23)
      The vesper bell had rung its parting note; the domini were mostly caged in comfortable quarters, discussing the merits of old port; and the merry student had closed his oak, to consecrate the night to friendship, sack, and claret.

Related terms

  • domina
  • donzel

Further reading

  • Dominus (title) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • dimuons

Esperanto

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /doˈminus/

Verb

dominus

  1. conditional of domini

Latin

Etymology

  • from Proto-Italic *dom-o/u-nos (of the house); both u- and o-stems are found in other branches;
  • from Proto-Italic *domanos, from Proto-Indo-European *domh₂nos (subduing), from *demh₂- (to domesticate, tame), whence also domō.

In either case likely further related to Latin domus from Proto-Indo-European *dem-.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈdo.mi.nus/, [ˈd̪ɔmɪnʊs̠]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈdo.mi.nus/, [ˈd̪ɔːminus]

Noun

dominus m (genitive dominī, feminine domina); second declension

  1. a master, possessor, ruler, lord, proprietor
  2. an owner of a residence; the master of its servants and slaves
  3. the master of a feast, the entertainer, host
  4. the master of a play or of public games, the employer of players or gladiators
  5. sir (greeting, in the vocative case)

Declension

Second-declension noun.

Synonyms

  • domnus
  • erus

Derived terms

Descendants

References

  • dominus” on page 571 of the Oxford Latin Dictionary (1st ed., 1968–82)
  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “domus, dominus”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, pages 177-179

Further reading

  • dominus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • dominus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • dominus in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • dŏmĭnus in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette, page 555
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
  • dominus in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper’s Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • dominus in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  • Niermeyer, Jan Frederik (1976), “dominus”, in Mediae Latinitatis Lexicon Minus, Leiden, Boston: Brill, pages 353–4

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