dominie vs dominus what difference

what is difference between dominie and dominus

English

Etymology

Alteration of domine, with spelling changed to reflect pronunciation. Doublet of dom, dominus, and don.

Noun

dominie (plural dominies)

  1. (now chiefly Scotland) A schoolmaster, teacher.
    • 1858, James Hogg, Titan (volume 27, page 306)
      In the first room we entered, a soldier and a man, like a clerk or dominie, were discussing a bottle of red wine; they immediately sprang up and politely proffered us each a bumper.
    • 1876, Mark Twain, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, XXI:
      the sign-painter’s boy said that when the dominie had reached the proper condition on Examination Evening he would “manage the thing”.
    • 1932, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Sunset Song, Polygon 2006 (A Scots Quair), p. 24:
      when it was time for the Strachan bairns to pass the end of the Cuddiestoun road on their way to school down there she was waiting and gave the paper to the eldest, the quean Marget, and told her to show it to the Dominie and ask him what it might mean.
  2. (US) A pastor of the Dutch Reformed Church.

Related terms

  • donzel

Scots

Etymology

From Latin domine, vocative singular of dominus (lord”, “sir”, “head of household); from domus (house) + -inus.

Noun

dominie (plural dominies)

  1. schoolmaster, teacher


English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin dominus (master). Doublet of dom, domine, dominie, and don.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdɒmɪnəs/

Noun

dominus (plural domini)

  1. master; sir; a title of respect formerly applied to a knight or clergyman, and sometimes to the lord of a manor or an academic master
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Cowell to this entry?)
    • The New Sporting Magazine (volume 15, page 23)
      The vesper bell had rung its parting note; the domini were mostly caged in comfortable quarters, discussing the merits of old port; and the merry student had closed his oak, to consecrate the night to friendship, sack, and claret.

Related terms

  • domina
  • donzel

Further reading

  • Dominus (title) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • dimuons

Esperanto

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /doˈminus/

Verb

dominus

  1. conditional of domini

Latin

Etymology

  • from Proto-Italic *dom-o/u-nos (of the house); both u- and o-stems are found in other branches;
  • from Proto-Italic *domanos, from Proto-Indo-European *domh₂nos (subduing), from *demh₂- (to domesticate, tame), whence also domō.

In either case likely further related to Latin domus from Proto-Indo-European *dem-.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈdo.mi.nus/, [ˈd̪ɔmɪnʊs̠]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈdo.mi.nus/, [ˈd̪ɔːminus]

Noun

dominus m (genitive dominī, feminine domina); second declension

  1. a master, possessor, ruler, lord, proprietor
  2. an owner of a residence; the master of its servants and slaves
  3. the master of a feast, the entertainer, host
  4. the master of a play or of public games, the employer of players or gladiators
  5. sir (greeting, in the vocative case)

Declension

Second-declension noun.

Synonyms

  • domnus
  • erus

Derived terms

Descendants

References

  • dominus” on page 571 of the Oxford Latin Dictionary (1st ed., 1968–82)
  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “domus, dominus”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, pages 177-179

Further reading

  • dominus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • dominus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • dominus in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • dŏmĭnus in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette, page 555
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
  • dominus in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper’s Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • dominus in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  • Niermeyer, Jan Frederik (1976), “dominus”, in Mediae Latinitatis Lexicon Minus, Leiden, Boston: Brill, pages 353–4

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