dominion vs rule what difference

what is difference between dominion and rule

English

Etymology

From Middle English dominion, from Middle French dominion, from Medieval Latin dominio, equiv. to Latin dominium (lordship, right of ownership), from dominus (lord), from domus (house). See demain, demesne, domain, dominium.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dəˈmɪnjən/, /doʊˈmɪnjən/
  • Rhymes: -ɪnjən
  • Hyphenation: do‧min‧ion

Noun

dominion (countable and uncountable, plural dominions)

  1. Power or the use of power; sovereignty over something; stewardship, supremacy.
    • 1881, Benjamin Jowett, Thucydides Translated into English
      To choose between dominion or slavery.
  2. predominance; ascendancy
    • Objects placed foremost ought [] have dominion over things which are confus’d and transient.
  3. (sometimes figuratively) A kingdom, nation, or other sphere of influence; governed territory.
  4. (taxonomy) kingdom
  5. (biblical tradition) An order of angel in Christian angelology, ranked above virtues and below thrones.
    Synonym: domination

Related terms

  • dominate
  • domination
  • dominator
  • domineering
  • domino
  • subdominion

Translations

Further reading

  • dominion in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • dominion in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Finnish

Noun

dominion

  1. Genitive singular form of dominio.

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɔ.mi.njɔ̃/

Noun

dominion m (plural dominions)

  1. dominion

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From English dominion, from Latin dominium

Noun

dominion m (definite singular dominionen, indefinite plural dominioner or dominions, definite plural dominionene)

  1. a dominion

Usage notes

The use of dominions as indefinite plural may be from Danish via Riksmål.

References

  • “dominion” in The Bokmål Dictionary.
  • “dominion” in Det Norske Akademis ordbok (NAOB).

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From English dominion, from Latin dominium

Noun

dominion m (definite singular dominionen, indefinite plural dominionar, definite plural dominionane)

  1. a dominion

References

  • “dominion” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Romanian

Etymology

From French dominion

Noun

dominion n (plural dominioane)

  1. dominion

Declension



English

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ɹuːl/, [ɹuːɫ]
  • Rhymes: -uːl

Etymology 1

From Middle English reule, rewle, rule, borrowed from Old French riule, reule, itself an early semi-learned borrowing from Latin regula (straight stick, bar, ruler, pattern), from regō (to keep straight, direct, govern, rule), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₃réǵeti (to straighten; right), from the root *h₃reǵ-; see regent.

Noun

rule (countable and uncountable, plural rules)

  1. A regulation, law, guideline.
    • a. 1694, John Tillotson, Of The Obligations of Christians to a Holy Life
      We profess to have embraced a religion which contains the most exact rules for the government of our lives.
  2. A regulating principle.
    • c. 1604, William Shakespeare, All’s well that ends well, Act I, scene I
      There’s little can be said in ‘t; ‘Tis against the rule of nature.
  3. The act of ruling; administration of law; government; empire; authority; control.
  4. A normal condition or state of affairs.
    My rule is to rise at six o’clock.
  5. (obsolete) Conduct; behaviour.
  6. (law) An order regulating the practice of the courts, or an order made between parties to an action or a suit.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wharton to this entry?)
  7. (mathematics) A determinate method prescribed for performing any operation and producing a certain result.
    a rule for extracting the cube root
  8. A ruler; device for measuring, a straightedge, a measure.
    • a. 1716, Robert South, Sermons
      As we may observe in the Works of Art, a Judicious Artist will indeed use his Eye, but he will trust only to his Rule.
  9. A straight line (continuous mark, as made by a pen or the like), especially one lying across a paper as a guide for writing.
  10. (printing, dated) A thin plate of brass or other metal, of the same height as the type, and used for printing lines, as between columns on the same page, or in tabular work.

Derived terms

Related terms

  • regulate
  • regent
  • regular

Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English rulen, borrowed from Old French riuler, from Latin regulāre (to regulate, rule), from regula (a rule); see regular and regulate.

Verb

rule (third-person singular simple present rules, present participle ruling, simple past and past participle ruled)

  1. (transitive) To regulate, be in charge of, make decisions for, reign over.
  2. (slang, intransitive) To excel.
  3. (intransitive) To decide judicially.
  4. (transitive) To establish or settle by, or as by, a rule; to fix by universal or general consent, or by common practice.
    • 1687, Francis Atterbury, An Answer to some Considerations, the Spirit of Martin Luther and the Original of the Reformation
      That’s a ruled case with the school-men.
  5. (transitive) To mark (paper or the like) with rules (lines).

Synonyms

  • (to excel): rock (also slang)

Antonyms

  • (to excel): suck (vulgar slang)

Derived terms

Translations

Etymology 3

Related to revel.

Noun

rule

  1. (obsolete) Revelry.

Verb

rule (third-person singular simple present rules, present participle ruling, simple past and past participle ruled)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive) To revel.

Further reading

  • rule in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • rule in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • ReLU, Ruel, lure

Spanish

Verb

rule

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of rular.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of rular.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of rular.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of rular.

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