dominion vs territory what difference

what is difference between dominion and territory

English

Etymology

From Middle English dominion, from Middle French dominion, from Medieval Latin dominio, equiv. to Latin dominium (lordship, right of ownership), from dominus (lord), from domus (house). See demain, demesne, domain, dominium.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dəˈmɪnjən/, /doʊˈmɪnjən/
  • Rhymes: -ɪnjən
  • Hyphenation: do‧min‧ion

Noun

dominion (countable and uncountable, plural dominions)

  1. Power or the use of power; sovereignty over something; stewardship, supremacy.
    • 1881, Benjamin Jowett, Thucydides Translated into English
      To choose between dominion or slavery.
  2. predominance; ascendancy
    • Objects placed foremost ought [] have dominion over things which are confus’d and transient.
  3. (sometimes figuratively) A kingdom, nation, or other sphere of influence; governed territory.
  4. (taxonomy) kingdom
  5. (biblical tradition) An order of angel in Christian angelology, ranked above virtues and below thrones.
    Synonym: domination

Related terms

  • dominate
  • domination
  • dominator
  • domineering
  • domino
  • subdominion

Translations

Further reading

  • dominion in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • dominion in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Finnish

Noun

dominion

  1. Genitive singular form of dominio.

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɔ.mi.njɔ̃/

Noun

dominion m (plural dominions)

  1. dominion

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From English dominion, from Latin dominium

Noun

dominion m (definite singular dominionen, indefinite plural dominioner or dominions, definite plural dominionene)

  1. a dominion

Usage notes

The use of dominions as indefinite plural may be from Danish via Riksmål.

References

  • “dominion” in The Bokmål Dictionary.
  • “dominion” in Det Norske Akademis ordbok (NAOB).

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From English dominion, from Latin dominium

Noun

dominion m (definite singular dominionen, indefinite plural dominionar, definite plural dominionane)

  1. a dominion

References

  • “dominion” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Romanian

Etymology

From French dominion

Noun

dominion n (plural dominioane)

  1. dominion

Declension



English

Etymology

Latin territorium from terra (the earth) and -torium (place of occurrence).

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈtɛɹɪˌtɔɹi/
  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈtɛɹɪt(ə)ɹi/

Noun

territory (countable and uncountable, plural territories)

  1. A large extent or tract of land; for example a region, country or district.
  2. (Canada) One of three of Canada’s federated entities, located in the country’s Arctic, with fewer powers than a province and created by an act of Parliament rather than by the Constitution: Yukon, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut.
  3. (Australia) One of three of Australia’s federated entities, located in the country’s north and southeast, with fewer powers than a state and created by an act of Parliament rather than by the Constitution: Northern Territory, Australian Capital Territory and Jervis Bay Territory.
  4. A geographic area under control of a single governing entity such as state or municipality; an area whose borders are determined by the scope of political power rather than solely by natural features such as rivers and ridges.
  5. (ecology) An area that an animal of a particular species consistently defends against its conspecifics.
  6. (sports and games) The part of the playing field or board over which a player or team has control.
  7. A geographic area that a person or organization is responsible for in the course of work.
  8. A location or logical space which someone owns or controls.
  9. A market segment or scope of professional practice over which an organization or type of practitioner has exclusive rights.
  10. An area of subject matter, knowledge, or experience.
    • 12 July 2012, Sam Adams, AV Club Ice Age: Continental Drift
      The matter of whether the world needs a fourth Ice Age movie pales beside the question of why there were three before it, but Continental Drift feels less like an extension of a theatrical franchise than an episode of a middling TV cartoon, lolling around on territory that’s already been settled.

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations


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