doom vs fate what difference

what is difference between doom and fate

English

Etymology

From Middle English dome, dom, from Old English dōm (judgement), from Proto-Germanic *dōmaz, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰóh₁mos. Compare West Frisian doem, Dutch doem, Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish dom, Icelandic dómur. Doublet of duma. See also deem.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /duːm/
  • Rhymes: -uːm

Noun

doom (countable and uncountable, plural dooms)

  1. Destiny, especially terrible.
  2. An undesirable fate; an impending severe occurrence or danger that seems inevitable.
  3. A feeling of danger, impending danger, darkness or despair.
  4. (countable, obsolete) A law.
  5. (countable, obsolete) A judgment or decision.
  6. (countable, obsolete) A sentence or penalty for illegal behaviour.
    • 1874, John Richard Green, A Short History of the English People
      The first dooms of London provide especially the recovery of cattle belonging to the citizens.
  7. Death.
    They met an untimely doom when the mineshaft caved in.
  8. (sometimes capitalized) The Last Judgment; or, an artistic representation thereof.

Antonyms

  • (undesirable fate): fortune

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

  • deem
  • -dom

Translations

Verb

doom (third-person singular simple present dooms, present participle dooming, simple past and past participle doomed)

  1. (transitive) To pronounce judgment or sentence on; to condemn.
    • Absolves the just, and dooms the guilty souls.
  2. To destine; to fix irrevocably the ill fate of.
  3. (obsolete) To judge; to estimate or determine as a judge.
  4. (obsolete) To ordain as a penalty; hence, to mulct or fine.
  5. (archaic, US, New England) To assess a tax upon, by estimate or at discretion.

Translations

See also

  • doomsday
  • doomsaying
  • damn

Anagrams

  • Odom, mood

Wolof

Pronunciation

Noun

doom (definite form doom ji)

  1. child, offspring
  2. seed


English

Etymology

From Latin fata (prediction), plural of fatum, from fatus (spoken), from for (to speak). Displaced native Old English wyrd.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /feɪt/
  • Rhymes: -eɪt

Noun

fate (countable and uncountable, plural fates)

  1. The presumed cause, force, principle, or divine will that predetermines events.
  2. The effect, consequence, outcome, or inevitable events predetermined by this cause.
  3. An event or a situation which is inevitable in the fullness of time.
  4. Destiny; often with a connotation of death, ruin, misfortune, etc.
  5. (mythology) Alternative letter-case form of Fate (one of the goddesses said to control the destiny of human beings).

Synonyms

  • destiny
  • doom
  • fortune
  • kismet
  • lot
  • necessity
  • orlay
  • predestination
  • wyrd

Antonyms

  • choice
  • free will
  • freedom
  • chance

Derived terms

  • fatal
  • fatalism
  • fatality
  • tempt fate

Related terms

  • amor fati (Amor fati)

Translations

See also

  • determinism
  • indeterminism

Verb

fate (third-person singular simple present fates, present participle fating, simple past and past participle fated)

  1. (transitive) To foreordain or predetermine, to make inevitable.
    The oracle’s prediction fated Oedipus to kill his father; not all his striving could change what would occur.
    • 2011, James Al-Shamma, Sarah Ruhl: A Critical Study of the Plays (page 119)
      At the conclusion of this part, Eric, who plays Jesus and is now a soldier, captures Violet in the forest, fating her to a concentration camp.

Usage notes

  • In some uses this may imply it causes the inevitable event.

Translations

Anagrams

  • EFTA, TAFE, TFAE, feat, feat., feta

Fataluku

Numeral

fate

  1. four

Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfa.te/
  • Hyphenation: fà‧te

Verb

fate

  1. inflection of fare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative

Noun

fate f

  1. plural of fata

Anagrams

  • afte

Latin

Participle

fāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of fātus

Murui Huitoto

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈɸa.tɛ]
  • Hyphenation: fa‧te

Verb

fate

  1. (transitive) to hit
  2. (intransitive) to hit

References

  • Katarzyna Izabela Wojtylak (2017) A grammar of Murui (Bue): a Witotoan language of Northwest Amazonia.[1], Townsville: James Cook University press (PhD thesis), page 130

Norwegian Nynorsk

Verb

fate (present tense fatar, past tense fata, past participle fata, passive infinitive fatast, present participle fatande, imperative fat)

  1. Alternative form of fata

Anagrams

  • EFTA, efta, feta

Scots

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /feːt/

Noun

fate

  1. feat

Volapük

Noun

fate

  1. dative singular of fat

Yamdena

Alternative forms

  • fat

Etymology

From Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *ǝpat, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *ǝpat, from Proto-Austronesian *Sǝpat.

Numeral

fate

  1. Alternative form of fat

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