doom vs sentence what difference

what is difference between doom and sentence

English

Etymology

From Middle English dome, dom, from Old English dōm (judgement), from Proto-Germanic *dōmaz, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰóh₁mos. Compare West Frisian doem, Dutch doem, Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish dom, Icelandic dómur. Doublet of duma. See also deem.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /duːm/
  • Rhymes: -uːm

Noun

doom (countable and uncountable, plural dooms)

  1. Destiny, especially terrible.
  2. An undesirable fate; an impending severe occurrence or danger that seems inevitable.
  3. A feeling of danger, impending danger, darkness or despair.
  4. (countable, obsolete) A law.
  5. (countable, obsolete) A judgment or decision.
  6. (countable, obsolete) A sentence or penalty for illegal behaviour.
    • 1874, John Richard Green, A Short History of the English People
      The first dooms of London provide especially the recovery of cattle belonging to the citizens.
  7. Death.
    They met an untimely doom when the mineshaft caved in.
  8. (sometimes capitalized) The Last Judgment; or, an artistic representation thereof.

Antonyms

  • (undesirable fate): fortune

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

  • deem
  • -dom

Translations

Verb

doom (third-person singular simple present dooms, present participle dooming, simple past and past participle doomed)

  1. (transitive) To pronounce judgment or sentence on; to condemn.
    • Absolves the just, and dooms the guilty souls.
  2. To destine; to fix irrevocably the ill fate of.
  3. (obsolete) To judge; to estimate or determine as a judge.
  4. (obsolete) To ordain as a penalty; hence, to mulct or fine.
  5. (archaic, US, New England) To assess a tax upon, by estimate or at discretion.

Translations

See also

  • doomsday
  • doomsaying
  • damn

Anagrams

  • Odom, mood

Wolof

Pronunciation

Noun

doom (definite form doom ji)

  1. child, offspring
  2. seed


English

Etymology

Borrowing from Middle French sentence, from Latin sententia (way of thinking, opinion, sentiment), from sentiēns, present participle of sentiō (to feel, think); see sentient, sentience, sense, scent.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsɛntəns/
    • (General American) IPA(key): [ˈsɛntn̩t͡s], [ˈsɛnʔn̩t͡s]
  • Hyphenation: sen‧tence

Noun

sentence (plural sentences)

  1. (dated) The decision or judgement of a jury or court; a verdict. [from 14th c.]
  2. The judicial order for a punishment to be imposed on a person convicted of a crime. [from 14th c.]
    • 1900, Charles W. Chesnutt, The House Behind the Cedars, Chapter I,
      The murderer, he recalled, had been tried and sentenced to imprisonment for life, but was pardoned by a merciful governor after serving a year of his sentence.
  3. A punishment imposed on a person convicted of a crime.
  4. (obsolete) A saying, especially from a great person; a maxim, an apophthegm. [14th-19th c.]
    • 1748, Samuel Richardson, Clarissa, Letter 206:
      I am told that she writes well, and that all her letters are full of sentences.
  5. (grammar) A grammatically complete series of words consisting of a subject and predicate, even if one or the other is implied, and typically beginning with a capital letter and ending with a full stop. [from 15th c.]
  6. (logic) A formula with no free variables. [from 20th c.]
  7. (computing theory) Any of the set of strings that can be generated by a given formal grammar. [from 20th c.]
  8. (obsolete) Sense; meaning; significance.
    • 1387–1400, Geoffrey Chaucer, Canterbury Tales. General Prologue:
      Noght o word spak he moore than was neede,
      And that was seyd in forme and reverence
      And short and quyk and ful of hy sentence
    • 1649, John Milton, Eikonoklastes:
      now to the discourse itself, voluble enough, and full of sentence, but that, for the most part, either specious rather than solid, or to his cause nothing pertinent.
  9. (obsolete) One’s opinion; manner of thinking. [14th-17th c.]
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book II:
      My sentence is for open war.
  10. (now rare) A pronounced opinion or judgment on a given question. [from 14th c.]
    • 1687, Francis Atterbury, An Answer to some Considerations, the Spirit of Martin Luther and the Original of the Reformation
      By them [Luther’s works] we might pass sentence upon his doctrines.

Synonyms

  • verdict
  • conviction

Hypernyms

  • (logic): formula

Hyponyms

  • (grammar): affirmative sentence, complex sentence, compound sentence, conditional sentence, simple sentence

Related terms

  • sentential

Translations

Verb

sentence (third-person singular simple present sentences, present participle sentencing, simple past and past participle sentenced)

  1. To declare a sentence on a convicted person; to doom; to condemn to punishment.
    • 1900, Charles W. Chesnutt, The House Behind the Cedars, Chapter I,
      The murderer, he recalled, had been tried and sentenced to imprisonment for life, but was pardoned by a merciful governor after serving a year of his sentence.
  2. (obsolete) To decree or announce as a sentence.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  3. (obsolete) To utter sententiously.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Feltham to this entry?)

Translations

Further reading

  • sentence in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • sentence in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈsɛntɛnt͡sɛ]
  • Hyphenation: sen‧ten‧ce

Noun

sentence f

  1. sentence (formula with no free variables)
  2. sentence (grammar)

Declension

Synonyms

  • (grammar): věta

French

Etymology

From Old French sentence, from Latin sententia.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɑ̃.tɑ̃s/

Noun

sentence f (plural sentences)

  1. sentence
  2. verdict
  3. maxim, saying, adage

Latvian

Noun

sentence f (5th declension)

  1. aphorism
  2. maxim

Declension

Synonyms

  • aforisms
  • domu grauds

Middle French

Etymology

From Latin sententia.

Noun

sentence f (plural sentences)

  1. sentence (judgement; verdict)
  2. sentence (grammatically complete series of words)


Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial