doorkeeper vs usher what difference

what is difference between doorkeeper and usher

English

Alternative forms

  • door-keeper

Etymology

From door +‎ keeper.

Noun

doorkeeper (plural doorkeepers)

  1. The person in charge of an entryway, sometimes just a doorman, sometimes something more.
    • 1920, Willa Cather, Youth and the Bright Medusa.
      The manager at Carnegie Hall was told to get another usher in his stead; the doorkeeper at the theatre was warned not to admit him to the house; and Charley Edwards remorsefully promised the boy’s father not to see him again.

Translations



English

Etymology

From Middle English ussher, uscher, usscher, from Anglo-Norman usser and Old French ussier, uissier (porter, doorman) (compare French huissier), from Vulgar Latin *ustiārius (doorkeeper), from Latin ōstiārius, from ōstium (door). Akin to ōs (mouth). Probably a doublet of ostiary and huissier.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: ŭshʹ-ər, IPA(key): /ˈʌʃəɹ/
  • (General Australian) IPA(key): [ˈaʃ.ə(ɹ)]
  • (UK) IPA(key): [ˈʌʃ.ə(ɹ)]
  • (US) IPA(key): [ˈʌʃ.ɚ]
  • Rhymes: -ʌʃə(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: ush‧er

Noun

usher (plural ushers)

  1. A person, in a church, cinema etc., who escorts people to their seats.
  2. A male escort at a wedding.
  3. A doorkeeper in a courtroom.
  4. (obsolete) An assistant to a head teacher or schoolteacher; an assistant teacher.
    • 1751, Tobias Smollett, The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle, I.12:
      [H]e defrayed the expence of his entrance, and left him in the particular care and inspection of the usher, who [] though obliged by the scandalous administration of fortune to act in the character of an inferior teacher, had by his sole capacity and application, brought the school to that degree of reputation which it never could have obtained from the talents of his superior.
    • 1791, James Boswell, Life of Johnson, Oxford 2008, p. 33:
      He began to learn Latin with Mr. Hawkins, usher, or under-master of Lichfield school, ‘a man (said he) very skilful in his little way.’
  5. (dated, derogatory) Any schoolteacher.

Synonyms

  • (male attendant at a wedding): groomsman, bridesman

Derived terms

  • usherette
  • usheress

Translations

Verb

usher (third-person singular simple present ushers, present participle ushering, simple past and past participle ushered)

  1. To guide people to their seats.
    • 1836, Charles Dickens, Sketches by Boz, “The curate. The old lady. The half-pay captain.”
      Her entrance into church on Sunday is always the signal for a little bustle in the side aisle, occasioned by a general rise among the poor people, who bow and curtsey until the pew-opener has ushered the old lady into her accustomed seat, dropped a respectful curtsey, and shut the door;
  2. To accompany or escort (someone).
    • 1898, John Lothrop Motley, The Rise of the Dutch Republic, page 509
      Margaret was astonished at the magnificence of the apartments into which she was ushered.
  3. (figuratively) To precede; to act as a forerunner or herald.
    • 1912, Elizabeth Christine Cook, Literary Influences in Colonial Newspapers, 1704-1750, page 31
      Thus the Harvard poets and wits ushered The New England Courant out of existence.
  4. (figuratively, transitive) to lead or guide somewhere

Derived terms

  • usher in

Translations

Anagrams

  • Huser, Rhues, Ruhes, Uhers, erhus, huers, shure

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