doorman vs porter what difference

what is difference between doorman and porter

English

Etymology

From door +‎ -man.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)mən

Noun

doorman (plural doormen)

  1. A person who holds open the door at the entryway (entrance) to a building, summons taxicabs, and provides an element of security; in apartment buildings, he also accepts deliveries and may perform certain concierge type services.

Synonyms

  • doorkeeper

Coordinate terms

  • bouncer
  • hall porter
  • doorwoman

Derived terms

  • nondoorman
  • doormanship

Translations

Anagrams

  • madrono, madroño, mandoor

Spanish

Noun

doorman m (plural doormans)

  1. doorman


English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈpɔɹtɚ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈpɔːtə/
  • (rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /ˈpo(ː)ɹtɚ/
  • (non-rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /ˈpoətə/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)tə(ɹ)

Etymology 1

From Middle English porter, portere, portier, borrowed from Anglo-Norman portour and Old French porteor, from Late Latin portātor, from past participle of Latin portāre (to carry).

Noun

porter (plural porters)

  1. A person who carries luggage and related objects.
    By the time I reached the train station I was exhausted, but fortunately there was a porter waiting.
  2. (entomology) An ant having the specialized role of carrying.
  3. (computing) One who ports software (makes it usable on another platform).
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English porter, portere, portare, borrowed from Anglo-Norman portour and Old French portier, from Late Latin portarius (gatekeeper), from Latin porta (gate).

Noun

porter (plural porters)

  1. A person in control of the entrance to a building.
  2. (bowling) An employee who clears and cleans tables and puts bowling balls away.
  3. A strong, dark ale, originally favored by porters (etymology 1, sense 1), similar to a stout but less strong.
  4. (Ireland) Stout (malt brew).
Coordinate terms
  • (strong, dark ale): beer, stout
Derived terms
  • portership
Translations

Verb

porter (third-person singular simple present porters, present participle portering, simple past and past participle portered)

  1. To serve as a porter; to carry.

Anagrams

  • Perrot, perrot, porret, pretor, proter, report, troper

Catalan

Etymology

From porta or from Old Occitan [Term?], from Late Latin portārius, from Latin porta. Compare French portier.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic) IPA(key): /poɾˈte/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /purˈte/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /poɾˈteɾ/

Noun

porter m (plural porters)

  1. doorman, doorkeeper, gatekeeper
  2. goalkeeper

Related terms

  • porta

French

Etymology 1

From Old French porter, from Latin portāre, present active infinitive of portō, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *per- (go, traverse).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɔʁ.te/

Verb

porter

  1. to carry
  2. to support, to bear
  3. to wear
  4. (transitive with sur) to be about, to concern
  5. (reflexive, se porter) to feel, to carry one’s self

Conjugation

Derived terms
Related terms

Etymology 2

From English porter.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɔʁ.tɛʁ/
  • Homophone: portèrent

Noun

porter m (plural porters)

  1. porter (beer)
    • 1884, Joris-Karl Huysmans, À rebours, XI:
      il […] étancha sa soif avec le porter, cette bière noire qui sent le jus de réglisse dépouillé de sucre.

      He quenched his thirst with some porter, that dark beer which smells of unsweetened liquorice.

Anagrams

  • Perrot

Further reading

  • “porter” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Ladin

Etymology

From Latin portāre, present active infinitive of portō (bring, carry).

Verb

porter

  1. to carry

Conjugation

  • Ladin conjugation varies from one region to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

Latin

Verb

porter

  1. first-person singular present passive subjunctive of portō

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • portere, portare, portir, portor, portour, porteour

Etymology

Borrowed from Anglo-Norman porter, portour, equivalent to port +‎ -er.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɔrtər/, /pɔrˈtɛːr/

Noun

porter (plural porters)

  1. gatekeeper, doorkeeper

Descendants

  • English: porter
  • Yola: porther

References

  • “portē̆r, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Middle French

Etymology

From Old French porter, from Latin portō, portāre.

Verb

porter

  1. to carry

Conjugation

  • Middle French conjugation varies from one text to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

Descendants

  • French: porter

Norman

Alternative forms

  • portaïr (Guernsey)

Etymology

From Old French porter, from Latin portō, portāre.

Pronunciation

Verb

porter

  1. (Jersey) to carry
  2. (Jersey) to wear

Derived terms

  • porter un coup (to strike)
  • portchi (porter)

Norwegian Bokmål

Noun

porter m

  1. indefinite plural of port

Old French

Etymology

From Latin portāre, present active infinitive of portō.

Verb

porter

  1. to carry
  2. to carry a child (to be pregnant)

Conjugation

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. The forms that would normally end in *-ts, *-tt are modified to z, t. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

Related terms

  • portour

Descendants

  • Middle French: porter
    • French: porter

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial