dotage vs senility what difference

what is difference between dotage and senility

English

Etymology

dote +‎ -age, from Middle English doten (to dote).

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈdoʊtɪdʒ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈdəʊtɪdʒ/

Noun

dotage (countable and uncountable, plural dotages)

  1. Decline in judgment and other cognitive functions, associated with aging; senility.
  2. Fondness or attentiveness, especially to an excessive degree.
    • Claudio. And ſhe is exceeding wiſe.
      Prince. In euery thing, but in louing Benedicke. [] I would ſhee had beſtowed this dotage on mee,
  3. Foolish utterance(s); drivel.

Synonyms

  • (loss of mental acuity associated with aging): second childhood

Translations

Anagrams

  • dogate, goated, togaed

Middle English

Etymology

From doten +‎ -age.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdɔːtaːdʒ(ə)/

Noun

dotage (uncountable) (Late Middle English)

  1. Behaviour that is stupid or ill-advised; ridiculousness or insanity:
    1. Ill-thought or fatuitous love or romantic feelings.
    2. Weakening of the mind due to age; dotage.
  2. Disintegration, rotting, or collapsing.

Descendants

  • English: dotage

References

  • “dōtāǧe, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-08-12.


English

Etymology

senile +‎ -ity

Alternative forms

  • sinility

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɪlɪti

Noun

senility (countable and uncountable, plural senilities)

  1. (chiefly uncountable) Senescence; the bodily and mental deterioration associated with old age.
  2. (chiefly uncountable) The losing of memory and reason due to senescence.
    He was entering his years of senility and not liking it a bit.
  3. (countable, archaic) An elderly, senile person.

Antonyms

  • juvenility

Related terms

  • senile

Translations


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