Doughnut vs Bismarck what difference

what is difference between Doughnut and Bismarck

English

Alternative forms

  • donut (North America)
  • dough-nut (archaic)

Etymology

From dough +‎ nut, 1809 because originally small, nut-sized balls of fried dough, or, more likely, from nut in the earlier sense of “small rounded cake or cookie”, with the toroidal shape becoming common in the twentieth century. First attested in Knickerbocker’s History of New York, by Washington Irving, 1809.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈdəʊˌnʌt/
  • (US, Canada) IPA(key): /ˈdoʊnət/, /ˈdoʊˌnʌt/
  • Hyphenation: dough‧nut

Noun

doughnut (plural doughnuts)

  1. A deep-fried piece of dough or batter, commonly of a toroidal (a ring doughnut) shape, often mixed with various sweeteners and flavourings; or flattened sphere (a filled doughnut) shape filled with jam, custard or cream.
    • 1865, Frank B. Goodrich, The Tribute Book, Derby & Miller, page 45,
      The soldiers, drawn up in hollow square—how apt is this word hollow, when applied to men who have fasted, in view of promised doughnuts!—received the procession, which consisted of music, then the ladies, then the doughnuts.
    • 2003, Len Fisher, How to Dunk a Doughnut, U.S. Edition, Arcade Publishing page 2,
      One American student sought my help to take the work further in his school science project, in which he studied how doughnuts differ from cookies.
    • 2018, Karen Scott, Margaret Webb, Clare Kostelnick, Long-Term Caring: Residential, Home and Community Aged Care, 4th Edition, Australia and New Zealand Edition, Elsevier Australia, page 227,
      The prostate gland lies just below the bladder and is shaped like a doughnut.
  2. Anything in the shape of a torus.
    1. (attributive) A circular life raft.
      • 1996, John Long, Close Shaves: Classic Stories on the Edge (page 2)
        He put on the life jacket and began paddling around. A doughnut life raft popped up out of the ocean in front of him.
    2. (physics) A toroidal vacuum chamber.
      • 2012, Edward Creutz, Nuclear Instrumentation I (page 213)
        In about 1951, the same company sealed into their vacuum doughnuts the regenerative peelers so that X-ray beams or electron beams could be obtained with the sealed off commercial tubes used in []
    3. (Canada, US) A peel-out or skid mark in the shape of a circle; a 360-degree skid.
    4. A spare car tyre, usually stored in the boot, that is smaller than a full-sized tyre and is only intended for temporary use.
    5. A kind of tyre for an airplane.
      • 1975, Flight International (volume 107, part 2)
        The advantage of the doughnuts was that they spread the weight of the aeroplane over a much larger area of ground, causing less damage to grass, and making them less prone to bogging down in wet conditions.
  3. (slang) A vulva; (by extension) a woman’s virginity.
  4. (Britain, colloquial) A foolish or stupid person.
    • 2012, Gordon Ramsay, Kitchen Nightmares “Michons”:
      You fucking doughnut, of course you don’t microwave a salad!

Synonyms

  • (anything in the shape of a torus): ring, torus

Derived terms

  • bet a dollar to a doughnut
  • doughnut pessary
  • jam doughnut
  • ring doughnut

Translations

See also

  • bagel
  • koulouri
  • torus
  • toroid

References



English

Etymology

Named for the German statesman Otto von Bismarck.

Noun

bismarck (plural bismarcks)

  1. (Canada, US) A dessert pastry:
    1. (Manitoba) A doughnut filled with cream, often with chocolate icing.
    2. (Alberta, Saskatchewan, Northern US, US Midwest) A jelly doughnut: a doughnut filled with jam and coated with sugar.
    3. (Midland US) A fried cruller, or a sort of pancake.

See also

  • Berliner
  • Burlington bun
  • Dutch baby pancake, Dutch baby, Dutch puff
  • jambuster
  • jelly doughnut

References

  • “bismarck” in the Canadian Oxford Dictionary, Second Edition, Oxford University Press, 2004.

Finnish

Noun

bismarck

  1. (card games) A certain card game.

Declension

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