douse vs soak what difference

what is difference between douse and soak

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: daus, IPA(key): /daʊs/
  • Rhymes: -aʊs

Etymology 1

Probably of North Germanic origin, related to Swedish dunsa (to plumb down, fall clumsily), Danish dunse (to thump). Compare Old English dwǣsċan (to extinguish) and douse below.

Alternative forms

  • dowse, douze, douce, dause (all obsolete or nonstandard)

Verb

douse (third-person singular simple present douses, present participle dousing, simple past and past participle doused)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To plunge suddenly into water; to duck; to immerse.
  2. (intransitive) To fall suddenly into water.
  3. (transitive) To put out; to extinguish.
    • 1999, Arthur D. Jacobs, The Prison Called Hohenasperg
      The man who doused the fire was told to put the remainder of the coal into the bucket and then give the bucket to the soldier.
    • Kelly Henderson, Your Mythic Spirit Guide: Spirituality for a Creative Life
      Once you feel confident in your visualizations, you may douse the candle by blowing it out.
Translations

Noun

douse (plural douses)

  1. A sudden plunging into water.
    • 1911, Cyphers Series on Practical Poultry Keeping (issue 1, page 74)
      In winter a douse in cold water helps the looks and adds to the style of the carcass, but they should be thoroughly dried before packing.

Etymology 2

From Middle English duschen, dusshen (to rush, fall), related to Norwegian dusa (to break, cast down from), Old Dutch doesen (to beat, strike), dialectal German tusen, dusen (to strike, run against, collide), Saterland Frisian dössen (to strike). Compare doss, dust.

Alternative forms

  • dowse

Verb

douse (third-person singular simple present douses, present participle dousing, simple past and past participle doused)

  1. (transitive) To strike, beat, or thrash.
  2. (transitive, nautical) To strike or lower in haste; to slacken suddenly
    Douse the topsail!
Translations

Noun

douse (plural douses)

  1. A blow or stroke, especially to the face.

Anagrams

  • oused

Middle English

Noun

douse

  1. Alternative form of douce


English

Etymology

From Middle English soken, from Old English socian (to soak, steep, literally to cause to suck (up)), from Proto-Germanic *sukōną (to soak), causative of Proto-Germanic *sūkaną (to suck). Cognate with Middle Dutch soken (to cause to suck). More at suck.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) enPR: sōk, IPA(key): /səʊk/
  • Rhymes: -əʊk
  • (US) enPR: sōk, IPA(key): /soʊk/
  • Rhymes: -əʊk
  • Homophone: soke

Verb

soak (third-person singular simple present soaks, present participle soaking, simple past and past participle soaked)

  1. (intransitive) To be saturated with liquid by being immersed in it.
  2. (transitive) To immerse in liquid to the point of saturation or thorough permeation.
  3. (intransitive) To penetrate or permeate by saturation.
  4. (transitive) To allow (especially a liquid) to be absorbed; to take in, receive. (usually + up)
  5. (figuratively, transitive) To take money from.
    • 1928, Upton Sinclair, Boston
      It’s a blackmail ring, and the district attorneys get a share of the loot. [] Well, they got him in the same kind of jam, and soaked him to the tune of three hundred and eighty-six thousand.
  6. (slang, dated) To drink intemperately or gluttonously.
  7. (metallurgy, transitive) To heat (a metal) before shaping it.
  8. (ceramics, transitive) To hold a kiln at a particular temperature for a given period of time.
  9. (figuratively, transitive) To absorb; to drain.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir H. Wotton to this entry?)

Derived terms

  • soak away, soakaway
  • soak up

Translations

Verb

soak (third-person singular simple present soaks, present participle soaking, simple past and past participle soaked)

  1. (transitive) (slang, boxing) To hit or strike.

Noun

soak (plural soaks)

  1. An immersion in water etc.
    After the strenuous climb, I had a nice long soak in a bath.
  2. (slang, Britain) A drunkard.
  3. (slang) A carouse; a drinking session.
  4. (Australia) A low-lying depression that fills with water after rain.
    • 1985, Peter Carey, Illywhacker, Faber & Faber 2003, p. 38:
      I set off early to walk along the Melbourne Road where, one of the punters had told me, there was a soak with plenty of frogs in it.
    • 1996, Doris Pinkington, Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence, in Heiss & Minter, Macquarie PEN Anthology of Aboriginal Literature, Allen & Unwin 2008, p. 170:
      Molly and Daisy finished their breakfast and decided to take all their dirty clothes and wash them in the soak further down the river.

Synonyms

  • (drunkard): alcoholic, souse, suck-pint; See also Thesaurus:drunkard

Translations

Anagrams

  • Kosa, koas, oaks, okas

Indonesian

Etymology

From Dutch zwak (weak), from Middle Dutch swac, from Old Dutch *swak, from Proto-West Germanic *swak.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈsoaʔ]
  • Hyphenation: so‧ak

Adjective

soak

  1. (colloquial) weak.
    Synonym: lemah

Further reading

  • “soak” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

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