dower vs endow what difference

what is difference between dower and endow

English

Etymology

From Middle English dower, dowere, from Old French doeire, from Medieval Latin dōtārium, from Latin dōs.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: dauʹ-ər, IPA(key): /ˈdaʊ.əɹ/
  • (UK) IPA(key): [ˈdaʊ.ə(ɹ)]
  • (US) IPA(key): [ˈdaʊ.ɚ]
  • Rhymes: -aʊ.ə(ɹ)
  • Homophone: dour (for some speakers)

Noun

dower (plural dowers)

  1. (law) The part of or interest in a deceased husband’s property provided to his widow, usually in the form of a life estate.
  2. (law) Property given by a groom directly to his bride at or before their wedding in order to legitimize the marriage; dowry.
    • 1610, The Tempest, by Shakespeare, act 3 scene 1
      [] how features are abroad, / I am skill-less of; but, by my modesty,— / The jewel in my dower,—I would not wish / Any companion in the world but you []
  3. (obsolete) That with which one is gifted or endowed; endowment; gift.
    • c. 1600, John Davies, The Dignity of Man
      How great, how plentiful, how rich a dower!
    • 1793, William Wordsworth, Descriptive Sketches
      Man in his primeval dower arrayed.

Antonyms

  • curtesy

Related terms

Translations

See also

  • bride price
  • dower on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Verb

dower (third-person singular simple present dowers, present participle dowering, simple past and past participle dowered)

  1. To give a dower or dowry.
  2. To endow.

Anagrams

  • e-word, rowed, worde

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • dowere, douweer, dowaire, dowaire, dowayr, douere

Etymology

Borrowed from Old French doeire, from Medieval Latin dōtārium; equivalent to dowen +‎ -er. Doublet of dowarye.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /duːˈɛːr(ə)/, /ˈduːər(ə)/

Noun

dower (plural dowers)

  1. A dower; a life estate of a male spouse’s property.
  2. (rare) A gift given by the bride’s family to the groom or his relatives; dowry.
  3. (rare, figuratively) A intrinsic or inherent property or attribute.
  4. (rare, astrology) A portion of the world under the domination of a particular star sign.

Descendants

  • English: dower
  • Scots: dower

References

  • “dǒuē̆r(e, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-10-12.


English

Etymology

From Late Middle English endowen, endouen, enduen, indouen, indw (to provide with assets, a livelihood, or privileges; to bestow, grant; (figuratively) to favour; to endow), from Anglo-Norman endouer, from Old French en- (prefix meaning ‘in, into’) + douer (to endow) (from Latin dōtāre (present active infinitive of dōtō (to endow)); modern French douer). Dōtō is derived from dōs (dowry; endowment, gift) (ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *deh₃- (to give)) + (suffix forming regular first-conjugation verbs).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɪnˈdaʊ/, /ɛn-/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɪnˈdaʊ/
  • Rhymes: -aʊ
  • Hyphenation: en‧dow

Verb

endow (third-person singular simple present endows, present participle endowing, simple past and past participle endowed)

  1. (transitive, archaic or obsolete) To provide with a dower (the portion that a widow receives from her deceased husband’s property) or a dowry (property given to a bride).
  2. (transitive) To give property to (someone) as a gift; specifically, to provide (a person or institution) with support in the form of a permanent fund of money or other benefits.
  3. (transitive) Followed by with, or rarely by of: to enrich or furnish with some faculty or quality.
    Synonym: begift
  4. (transitive) Usually in the passive: to naturally furnish (with something).
    Synonyms: bless, gift

Conjugation

Alternative forms

  • indow (obsolete)

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

References

Further reading

  • financial endowment on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • Downe, Woden, downe, nowed, owned, woned

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