dramatize vs pad what difference

what is difference between dramatize and pad

English

Etymology

From drama +‎ -ize.

Verb

dramatize (third-person singular simple present dramatizes, present participle dramatizing, simple past and past participle dramatized)

  1. to adapt a literary work so that it can be performed in the theatre, or on radio or television
  2. to present something in a dramatic or melodramatic manner

Translations


Portuguese

Verb

dramatize

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of dramatizar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of dramatizar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of dramatizar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of dramatizar


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pæd/
  • Hyphenation: pad
  • Rhymes: -æd

Etymology 1

1554, “bundle of straw to lie on”, probably from Low German or West Flemish pad (sole of the foot), perhaps ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *pent- (to pass), which would make it related to both path and find.

Noun

pad (plural pads)

  1. A flattened mass of anything soft, to sit or lie on.
  2. A cushion used as a saddle without a tree or frame.
  3. A soft, or small, cushion.
  4. A cushion-like thickening of the skin on the under side of the toes of animals.
  5. The mostly hairless flesh located on the bottom of an animal’s foot or paw.
  6. Any cushion-like part of the human body, especially the ends of the fingers.
  7. A stuffed guard or protection, especially one worn on the legs of horses to prevent bruising.
  8. A soft bag or cushion to relieve pressure, support a part, etc.
  9. A sanitary napkin.
  10. (US) A floating leaf of a water lily or similar plant.
  11. (cricket) A soft cover for a batsman’s leg that protects it from damage when hit by the ball.
  12. A kind of cushion for writing upon, or for blotting, especially one formed of many flat sheets of writing paper; now especially such a block of paper sheets as used to write on.
  13. A panel or strip of material designed to be sensitive to pressure or touch.
  14. A keypad.
  15. A flat surface or area from which a helicopter or other aircraft may land or be launched.
  16. An electrical extension cord with a multi-port socket on one end: “trip cord”
  17. The effect produced by sustained lower reed notes in a musical piece, most common in blues music.
  18. A synthesizer instrument sound used for sustained background sounds.
    Synonym: synth pad
  19. (US, slang) A bed.
  20. (colloquial) A small house, apartment, or mobile home occupied by a single person; such as a bachelor, playboy, etc.
  21. (Britain, slang) A prison cell.
  22. (cryptography) A random key (originally written on a disposable pad) of the same length as the plaintext.
  23. A mousepad.
  24. (electronics) The amount by which a signal has been reduced.
  25. (nautical) A piece of timber fixed on a beam to fit the curve of the deck.
    • 1875, William Clark Russell, Jilted – Or My Uncle’s Scheme
      let us at least trust that the hair-pins will do their duty, and maintain the respectability of passion by holding the pads and puffs and frizettes in their proper places.
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Related terms
  • synth pad
Translations

Verb

pad (third-person singular simple present pads, present participle padding, simple past and past participle padded)

  1. (transitive) To stuff.
  2. (transitive) To furnish with a pad or padding.
  3. (transitive) To increase the size of, especially by adding undesirable filler.
  4. (transitive) To imbue uniformly with a mordant.
  5. (transitive, cricket) To deliberately play the ball with the leg pad instead of the bat.
Derived terms
  • well-padded
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English pade, padde, from Old English padde, from Proto-Germanic *paddǭ (toad). Cognate with Dutch pad, German Low German Pad (toad), dialectal German Padde, Danish padde, Swedish padda, Icelandic padda (toad), and possibly to English paddle.

Alternative forms

  • padde

Noun

pad (plural pads)

  1. (Britain, dialectal) A toad.
Derived terms
  • paddock
  • padstool
  • shelpad

Etymology 3

From Dutch pad or Middle Low German pat (path). Doublet of path.

Noun

pad (plural pads)

  1. (Britain, dialectal, Australia, Ireland) A footpath, particularly one unformed or unmaintained; a road or track. See footpad.
  2. An easy-paced horse; a padnag.
    • 1842, Alfred Tennyson, The Lady of Shalott
      an abbot on an ambling pad
  3. (Britain, obsolete) A robber that infests the road on foot; a highwayman or footpad.
    • 1720, John Gay, “Fables”, in Poems on Several Occasions
      A Pad came pacing down the way :
      The Cur, with never-ceasing tongue ,
      Upon the passing trav’ler sprung
Derived terms
  • on the pad

Etymology 4

Perhaps an alteration of ped.

Noun

pad (plural pads)

  1. (Britain, dialectal) A type of wickerwork basket, especially as used as a measure of fish or other goods.

Etymology 5

Probably partly from Middle Low German [Term?], partly imitative. Some senses possibly influenced by pad (soft part of an animal’s foot, noun).

Verb

pad (third-person singular simple present pads, present participle padding, simple past and past participle padded)

  1. (transitive) To travel along (a road, path etc.).
    • 1727, William Somervile, The Fortune Hunter
      Padding the streets for half a crown.
  2. (intransitive) To travel on foot.
  3. (intransitive) To wear a path by walking.
    • 1855, Robert Browning, “Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came”, XXII
      Who were the strugglers, what war did they wage, / Whose savage trample thus could pad the dank / Soil to a plash? […]
  4. (intransitive) To walk softly, quietly or steadily, especially without shoes.
    • 1922, Margery Williams, The Velveteen Rabbit
      Their feet padded softly on the ground, and they crept quite close to him, twitching their noses, while the Rabbit stared hard to see which side the clockwork stuck out…
  5. (intransitive, obsolete) To practise highway robbery.
    • 1689, Cotton Mather, Memorable Providences, Relating to Witchcrafts and Possessions
      Their chief Argument is, That they never saw any Witches, therefore there are none. Just as if you or I should say, We never met with any Robbers on the Road, therefore there never was any Padding there.
Derived terms
  • high pad
  • padding
Translations

Etymology 6

Probably imitative, perhaps related to or influenced by Etymology 5, above.

Interjection

pad

  1. Indicating a soft flat sound, as of bare footsteps.
    I heard her soft footsteps, pad, pad along the corridor.
Translations

Noun

pad (plural pads)

  1. The sound of soft footsteps, or a similar noise made by an animal etc.
Translations

Derived terms

  • padless

References

  • Pad on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • ADP, APD, DPA, PDA, dap

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch pad.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [pɑt]

Noun

pad (plural paaie, diminutive paadjie)

  1. path; way; street

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɑt/
  • Hyphenation: pad
  • Rhymes: -ɑt

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch pat, from Old Dutch path, from Proto-West Germanic *paþ, from Proto-Germanic *paþaz (path). Cognate with English path, West Frisian paad and German Pfad.

Noun

pad n (plural paden, diminutive paadje n)

  1. path (narrow road, usually unpaved)
Derived terms
  • bergpad
  • bospad
  • duinpad
  • fietspad
  • gangpad
  • grindpad
  • hazenpad
  • kerkpad
  • kiezelpad
  • modderpad
  • olifantenpad
  • padvinder
  • ruiterpad
  • schelpenpad
  • tuinpad
  • voetpad
  • wandelpad
  • zandpad
  • zijpad
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: pad
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: pata
  • Jersey Dutch: pât, pāt
  • Negerhollands: pad, pat

Etymology 2

From Middle Dutch padde, pedde, from Old Dutch *padda, from Proto-West Germanic *paddā, from Proto-Germanic *paddǭ (toad).

Noun

pad f (plural padden, diminutive padje n)

  1. toad (an amphibian of the order Anura similar to a frog with shorter legs and more ragged skin)
Derived terms
  • bruine pad
  • donderpad
  • gewone pad
  • groene pad
  • knoflookpad
  • paddenstoel
  • paddentrek
  • reuzenpad
  • rugstreeppad
  • schildpad
  • Surinaamse pad
  • vuurbuikpad
  • vuurpad
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: padda

Etymology 3

Noun

pad c (plural padden, diminutive padje n)

  1. (cycling) The slot in the frame that accepts the axle of the wheel; dropout.

Hungarian

Etymology

From a Slavic language, compare Serbo-Croatian pod.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈpɒd]
  • Rhymes: -ɒd

Noun

pad (plural padok)

  1. bench
  2. (education) desk (of students in school, traditionally built together with the seats)
    Synonym: iskolapad
  3. (religion) pew (in a church)
  4. (law) dock (of the defendant, in court), stand (of a witness, in court)
  5. (dialectal) attic, loft
    Synonym: padlás

Declension

Derived terms

Further reading

  • pad in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pat/
  • Homophone: pat
  • Rhymes: -at

Etymology 1

Deverbal of padać.

Noun

pad m inan

  1. (sports) A quick fall with the whole body to the ground.

Etymology 2

Clipping of gamepad.

Noun

pad m inan

  1. (video games) gamepad
    Synonyms: gamepad, joypad
Declension

Further reading

  • pad in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • pad in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Serbo-Croatian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pâːd/

Noun

pȃd m (Cyrillic spelling па̑д)

  1. fall

Declension

Related terms

  • pȁsti

Volapük

Noun

pad (nominative plural pads)

  1. page

Declension


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